Soldier

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SOLDIER. A military man; a private in the army.
     2. The constitution of the United States, amend. art. 3, directs that no soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered in any house, without the 'consent of the owner; nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law.

References in classic literature ?
By this time I could understand a few words of their strange language, and when the colonel asked me if I would prefer to remain at the post as his body servant, I signified my willingness as emphatically as possible, for I had seen enough of the brutality of the common soldiers toward their white slaves to have no desire to start out upon a march of unknown length, chained by the neck, and driven on by the great whips that a score of the soldiers carried to accelerate the speed of their charges.
No one except the King may go in or out, for it is prophesied that she will marry a common soldier, and the King cannot submit to that.'
It an't so much of a catch, after looking out so sharp ever since she was a little chit, and costing such a deal in dress and show, to get a poor, common soldier, with one arm, is it, mim?
Consequently he has made a unique contribution to literature in his portrayals, in both prose and verse, of the English common soldier and of English army life on the frontiers of the Empire.
The governor, Lopez, was a common soldier at the time of the revolution; but has now been seventeen years in power.
One was the common soldier with the coffee, who said simply: "I will act for you, sir.
Given Greene's mastery of the operations around Petersburg, his assessment of the Union high command and his portrayal of both the common soldiers' ordeals and the impact of the siege on the city's civilians, the existing gap in Petersburg historiography has more than adequately been filled.
It offers all the qualities that we have come to expect from the author: deep and wide research, vivid detail, a blend of voices from common soldiers to commanders, blazing characterizations of the leading personalities within the conflict and a narrative that flows like a good novel.
Unlike common soldiers those who managed to get Viceroy Commission in the Bristh Army were awarded with fertile agricultural lands in the plain areas of central Punjab.
Drawing on official and published sources, military and labor histories, and memoirs, this book relates the working experiences of common soldiers pursuing pre-enlistment employment within the British army from 1790 to 1914 in specialized trades, as well as their attitudes and class conflicts, illustrating how class pervaded the structure of the army at every level, as the rank and file were treated worse than officers.
Manuel's story vividly describes his hatred of war, his contempt for leaders on both sides that allowed the bloodletting to drag on, and his empathy for common soldiers on both sides.
Regardless, botji William Tatum and Ilya Berkovich make compelling arguments about common soldiers' agency.