communion

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Jones wished me to read the communion, and, in fact, all the morning service; but, happily, the canons do not require this of an evening.
So, as I was saying, being all ready for the meeting, and no horse to ride on, I made up my mind to foot it; for they tell me there is a nice young man to be taken into communion to-night.
You feel like a disembodied spirit, immaterial; and you seem to be able to touch beauty as though it were a palpable thing; and you feel an intimate communion with the breeze, and with the trees breaking into leaf, and with the iridescence of the river.
Though he had now given up all idea of becoming a Roman Catholic, he still looked upon that communion with sympathy.
She suggested that Natasha should fast and prepare for Holy Communion, and Natasha gladly welcomed the idea.
The clear heights where she expected to walk in full communion had become difficult to see even in her imagination; the delicious repose of the soul on a complete superior had been shaken into uneasy effort and alarmed with dim presentiment.
Mary's pure spirit could hold no communion with mine; Mary's pure spirit had left me.
For a while he waits so, in sad and secret communion with himself.
Tomorrow is Communion Sunday and the church will be full of folks and they'll all have their best clothes on.
7) An act of communion -- the drinking of the potion here described -- was one of the most important pieces of ritual in the Eleusinian mysteries, as commemorating the sorrows of the goddess.
The complete degeneration of the Revolution into anarchy and tyranny further served to plunge him into a chaos of moral bewilderment, from which he was gradually rescued partly by renewed communion with Nature and partly by the influence of his sister Dorothy, a woman of the most sensitive nature but of strong character and admirable good sense.
I will simply call your attention to the fact that your modern systems of popular election, of two chambers, and of juries all had their origin in provincial and oecumenical councils, and in the episcopate and college of cardinals; but there is this difference,--the views of civilization held by our present-day philosophy seem to me to fade away before the sublime and divine conception of Catholic communion, the type of a universal social communion brought about by the word and the fact that are combined in religious dogma.