compound question


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compound question

n. When more than one question is combined in what seems to be a single question asked of a witness during a trial or deposition. A compound question can be objected to by opposing counsel since it is confusing to the witness, who is entitled to answer each question separately. If the objection is sustained the question must be withdrawn and asked in a series of separate questions. (See: objection)

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Actually, it is one compound question. Does a liberal democracy:
The idea behind having such a compound question and two alternative responses is important because it concentrates the voters' mind on the consequences of choosing one course rather than another and enhances the democratic legitimacy of the result.
You have already answered the question and shouldn't be asked it again; and 4) Compound Question. Two questions have been included in one inquiry, which could lead to confusing answers.
A compound question is a two-part question requiring separate answers.
He should refuse to answer a compound question unless told to do so by his attorney.
(2) They are also compound questions, with a "why" which asks about the nature of things in general, and a "what" which asks for specific details about what to do in particular situations.
It is the premise of this paper that many disciplines, inside and outside the social sciences, look at exactly these sorts of compound questions; that it is possible and useful to look how various disciplines identify and phrase such questions and also to look at the various methods that are employed to gain answers to them; that knowledge gained from other disciplines in these respects can then be applied to improve public policy analysis; and that new methods, or more likely and more properly speaking, hybrids of existing methods, or research protocols derived from them, can then be developed for actual use by public policy analysts.
Compound questions and the unit of analysis The original unit of analysis for this research was the individual email that contained the student's question.
The topic of compound questions is not widely addressed in the digital reference literature (Lankes, 1999).
Compound questions, like "Are you exposed to loud noises at home or work?" should be divided into two simple questions.
Multiple or compound questions tend to obfuscate the record of the proceeding and confuse the trier of fact.