comprehend


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Obviously the amount of detail given is dependent on a child's age, but being open to questions and replying with the facts is the best way of enabling children to comprehend, process and come to terms with the type of news events no-one wants to discuss.
In addition, for healthcare insurance providers, Comprehend 6 includes the Healthcare Insurance Solution Accelerator Template.
we tend to see and comprehend mostly what we expect.
Rhythm, by breaking up time into a structure that we can understand and even tap our feet along with, allows us to believe that we can comprehend the ominous ticking clock.
It is often easy for general education teachers to misjudge ELLs' ability to comprehend complex academic concepts expressed in decontextualized English because their true ability can be masked by their fluent basic communicative English.
The only ones he could comprehend were written for 3-year-olds - an audience he'd eventually get to know very well, indeed.
Sign language is the third most common language in North America and there are numerous books on the topic--but none quite so visual and easy to comprehend as Talking With Your Hands, Listening With Your Eyes: A Complete Photographic Guide To American Sign Language.
notes perceptively: "If, however, we are to begin to comprehend the dynamics that lead to terrorism, we need to pay attention to the disparity in our world between rich and poor that gives rise to anti-Western ideology.
Each features a single work strategically shot to confound attempts to comprehend it spatially, creating a series of visual puzzles that beg questions about the true nature of their subjects.
The Swift Report says that students "will no longer be tested on their ability to comprehend passages from scientific texts that are based on the controversial theory of evolution.
When students began work on a Holocaust project in the fall of 1998, they found it difficult to comprehend the staggering number of people--including six million Jews--who had been killed.
Many factors affect individuals' ability to comprehend, and in turn use or act on, health information and communication.