computation

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As the atom count increases, the computational tasks leap exponentially.
Several articles address important aspects of effective instruction for computational fluency.
The states (and the processes which are the transitions between such states) over which a computational psychology quantifies need not be individualistic because the cognitive systems to which they belong could be part of a wide computational system.
High priority will be given to projects that integrate multi-investigator, multidisciplinary approaches with a high degree of interplay between computational and experimental approaches.
His analysis of these hurdles can serve as a roadmap for those who work today to ensure that computational fluency becomes a part of all children's futures.
To get a measure of Rush Hour's computational complexity, Flake and Baum considered a generalized version of the puzzle--one in which the grid could be any number of cells wide and the single exit could be placed at any location on the grid's perimeter.
He is author and co-author of more than 80 original papers and book chapters on computational chemistry.
of Perugia, Italy) present 82 short, refereed papers from the 2007 International Conference on Computational Science and its Applications.
Such insights could lead to improved procedures, or algorithms, for solving challenging computational problems, whether they involve searching for optimal seating plans, developing airline schedules, or laying out complex circuitry on computer chips.
Handbook of Computational Econometrics examines the state of the art of computational econometrics and provides exemplary studies dealing with computational issues arising from a wide spectrum of econometric fields including such topics as bootstrapping, the evaluation of econometric software, and algorithms for control, optimization, and estimation.
SVMs--which are computational tools, not physical machines--take advantage of additional data in the form of pathology and serum measurements that are fed into the algorithm.
Cramer, a computational chemist at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis.

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