conation


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Related to conation: conative
See: conatus
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Although the concept of conation may be new to most social workers, it has been discussed and considered throughout history.
However, we believe that "experience" is quite simply a phenomenon that flows back into cognition, affect, and conation and is, in and of itself, not a separate hierarchy model stage.
The prevailing view among experimental psychologists is distinctly adverse to the existence of any peculiar kind of immediate experience distinctively characteristic of conation.
Furthermore, Ajzen (2005) also points out that the construct of attitude is de facto a hierarchical model with "evaluative attitude at the highest level, cognition, affect, and conation at an intermediate level, and specific beliefs, feelings, and action tendencies at the lowest level" (p.
Regarding conation, comparative advertising has no clear persuasive edge over noncomparative formats.
On behalf of the Vaiola Hospital Laboratory, Nuku'alofa, Tonga, the PPTC would also like to sincerely thank Remeny Weber, (Anatomical Pathology Whangarei Hospital,) Robyn Rawstorn, (Histology laboratory Medlab South, Timaru Hospital) anc Steven McCullough, (New Zealand Veterinary Pathology, Hamilton) for the generous Conation of Histology equipment nc longer required by their own laboratories.
Volitional Conation and volition represent "intentional mental occurrence[s]" (Conation) (Ginet, 2006, p.
This study explores the second type of symmetry in bilateral exchange between China and Korea, delving into how balanced asymmetrical effects are on the conation for relationship-building behavior, attitude, and belief about the host country.
As such, any act necessarily involves an integration of cognition, conation and emotion.
But there is no phenomenological element, nor any conceptual implication, in this sort of color-perception-involving intentionality of any kind of volitional constituent, construed as some form of teleology, conation, desire, want, need, aim, end, goal, purpose, and so on.