concert

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concert

noun accord, accordance, agreement, alliance, coaction, coadjument, coadjuvancy, coagency, coalition, coefficiency, collaboration, combination, commined action, combined effort, compatibility, complicity, concord, concordance, concurrence, concurrency, conjunction, consentaneity, consonance, fusion of interests, harmony, joint action, joint operaaion, merger, mutual assistance, pool, rapport, synergy, teamwork, unanimity, unison, unity
Associated concepts: acting in concert

concert

see ART AND PART.
References in classic literature ?
As they crossed the hall and entered the breakfast-room, Miss Vanstone was full of the all-absorbing subject of the last night's concert.
A very little headache; not half enough to make me regret the concert," she said, and walked away by herself to the window.
I'm ready for another concert to-night, and a ball to-morrow, and a play the day after.
You're better at home in your own bed, and as for that club concert, it's all nonsense, and little girls should not be allowed to go out to such places at all.
I never was to a concert in my life, and when the other girls talk about them in school I feel so out of it.
Anne's consequent humiliation was less than it might have been, however, in view of the concert and the spare-room bed.
But the men of less faith could not thus believe, and to such, concert appears the sole specific of strength.
But leave him alone, to recognize in every hour and place the secret soul; he will go up and down doing the works of a true member, and, to the astonishment of all, the work will be done with concert, though no man spoke.
He found occasion to remark, for the second time, that he had come straight back home after the concert at Queen's Hall.
Sara Ray alone remained serenely satisfied until the close of the concert, when we surrounded her with a whirlwind of reproaches.
The smaller the society, the fewer probably will be the distinct parties and interests composing it; the fewer the distinct parties and interests, the more frequently will a majority be found of the same party; and the smaller the number of individuals composing a majority, and the smaller the compass within which they are placed, the more easily will they concert and execute their plans of oppression.
Does it, in fine, consist in the greater obstacles opposed to the concert and accomplishment of the secret wishes of an unjust and interested majority?