Conclusive

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Conclusive

Determinative; beyond dispute or question. That which is conclusive is manifest, clear, or obvious. It is a legal inference made so peremptorily that it cannot be overthrown or contradicted.

A conclusive presumption cannot be refuted; no evidence can rebut it, as in the presumption that a child who is below a certain age has a fundamental inability to consent to sexual relations.

Conclusive evidence is evidence that is either unquestionable because it is so clear and convincing or because the law precludes its contradiction. A death certificate is considered conclusive evidence that a person has died.

CONCLUSIVE. What puts an end to a thing. A conclusive presumption of law, is one which cannot be contradicted even by direct and positive proof. Take, for example, the presumption that an infant is incapable of judging whether it is or is not against his interest; When infancy is pleaded and proved, the plaintiff cannot show that the defendant was within one day of being of age when the contract was made, and perfectly competent to make a contract. 3 Bouv. Inst. n. 3061.

EVIDENCE, CONCLUSIVE. That which, while uncontradicted, satisfies the judge and jury it is also that which cannot be contradicted.
     2. The record of a court of common law jurisdiction is conclusive as to the facts therein stated. 2 Wash. 64; 2 H. 55; 6 Conn. 508, But the judgment and record of a prize court is not conclusive evidence in the state courts, unless it had jurisdiction of the subject-matter; and whether it had or not, the state courts may decide. 1 Conn. 429. See as to the conclusiveness of the judgments of foreign courts of admiralty, 4 Cranch, 421, 434; 3 Cranch, 458; Gilmer, 16 Const. R. 381 1 N. & M. 5 3 7.

References in periodicals archive ?
In order to assess the informativeness and conclusiveness of a given segregating sites as a potential genetic marker, polymorphic information content (PIC) was determined, taking into account the number of alleles per given variable site and their frequency (Botstein et al., 1980).
The conclusiveness of the factors affecting employee willingness to knowledge sharing is shown in Tab.
Continuity inspired by porous thinking opens conclusiveness to the possibility of insecurity, instability, un-authority.
But reliance on a coerced confession vitiates a conviction because such a confession combines the persuasiveness of apparent conclusiveness with what judicial experience shows to be illusory and deceptive evidence.
The president's ironclad confidence in the conclusiveness of the science, and therefore the desirability of "common-sense gun safety laws," is echoed widely with every new mass shooting, from academia to the popular press to that guy you knew from high school on Facebook.
Second, his observation that Smad Place had already left for the racecourse was a pork pie of epic proportions as the Hennessy winner was still in his box tapping his watch and saying: "Where's the bus to work?" the big Gold Cup trial was robbed of conclusiveness when Djakadam fell at the tenth fence.
(12) By 1946, the conclusiveness of this directive was so well settled that the U.S.
Unfortunately, the same problems with reliability, validity, and conclusiveness remain, and more unfortunately, these problems are not at all a new phenomenon.
We know definitely - though not definitively, which implies conclusiveness - that the WMCA authors of the devolution bid are the seven boroughs that once comprised the metropolitan county.
The conclusiveness of the closing lines in fact serves to reinforce the inconclusive, contradictory nature of desire.
The small sample size limits the conclusiveness of results, and therefore further investigation should be undertaken in order to determine a convincing outcome regarding the effect of visual characteristics such as near vision and visual efficiency on handwriting.