concourse

(redirected from concourses)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
References in classic literature ?
All were mounted upon the small domestic bull thoats of the red Martians, and their trappings and ornamentation bore such a quantity of gorgeously colored feathers that I could not but be struck with the startling resemblance the concourse bore to a band of the red Indians of my own Earth.
A vast concourse of people heard the oath, and shouted when it was taken.
D'Artagnan called Raoul's attention to this concourse, adding: "The fellow will have no excuse for not paying his rent.
In place of these things was only a soundless gloom, more dreadful, more disheartening, more soul- killing than any concourse of sounds, no matter how full of fear and dread.
A slave rushed into the dining hall to cry that a great concourse of people was swarming through the palace gates.
As I entered, silence fell upon the great concourse of people that packed the auditorium.
The vast concourse of people swung their hats and shouted--the windows and housetops in the wide vicinity burst into a snowstorm of waving handkerchiefs, and the wavers of the same mingled their cheers with those of the masses below.
Anything more imposing than the sight that was presented by this vast and orderly concourse of armed men it is impossible to conceive.
On looking more closely, he perceived that the circle was much larger than was required simply for the purpose of getting warm at the king's fire, and that this concourse of people had not been attracted solely by the beauty of the hundred fagots which were burning.
When some larger concourse of men direct their activity to a common aim there is a yet sharper division of those who, because their activity is given to directing and commanding, take less less part in the direct work.
A child came bowling its hoop through the concourse of birds, and Ralph threw his last crumbs of bread into the bushes with a snort of impatience.
Five minutes later the merchant was leading his slave to the public market, where a great concourse of people filled the great open space in the centre of which stood the slave block.