condemn

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Condemn

To adjudge or find guilty of a crime and sentence. To declare a building or ship unsafe for use or occupancy. To decide that a navigable vessel is a prize or is unfit for service. To take privately owned land for public use in exchange for just compensation by virtue of the power of Eminent Domain.

condemn

v. 1) for a public agency to determine that a building is unsafe or unfit for habitation and must be torn down or rebuilt to meet building and health code requirements. 2) for a governmental agency to take private property for public use under the right of eminent domain, but constitutionally the property owner must receive just compensation. If an agreement cannot be reached then the owner is entitled to a court determination of value in a condemnation action (lawsuit), but the public body can take the property immediately upon deposit of the estimated value. 3) to sentence a convicted defendant to death. 4) send to prison. (See: condemnation action, eminent domain, capital punishment)

condemn

(Ban), verb abhor, abnegate, abrogate, bar, blackball, block, boycott, call a halt, cancel, cast aside, cast out, censor, check, counter, debar, deny, disallow, disapprove, discommode, discountenance, disfavor, disown, disqualify, embargo, enjoin, exclude, expel, forbid, forestall, frustrate, halt, hammer, impede, interdict, interrupt, keep in bounds, keep out, keep within bounds, lay an embargo on, limit, make immossible, object, obstruct, oppose, ostracize, outlaw, prevent, prohibit, proscribe, put a stop to, put an embargo on, put an end to, put one's veto to, put under an injunction, put under an interdiction, put under prohibition, quash, quell, refuse, reject, repress, reprobate, restrain, restrict access, retard, seclude, shut out, stop, suppress, thwart, vetare, withhold

condemn

(Blame), verb accuse, anathematize, asperse, assail with censure, attack, berate, bring into discredit, call to account, cast blame upon, castigate, charge, chide, condemnare, criticize, culpare, declaim against, decry, denigrate, denounce, deprecate, derogate, disapprove, disdain, disparage, dispraise, execrate, find guilty, fulminate against, impeach, implicate, impugn, indict, inveigh against, pass censure on, publicly accuse, rebuke, reprehend, reproach, reprove, repudiate, take to task, upbraid, vilify, vituperare, vituperate

condemn

(Punish), verb adjudge, administer correction, bring to account, carry out a sentence, convict, damnare, deal retributive justice, discipline, doom, exact a penalty, exact retribution, execute a sentence, execute justice, impose a penalty, impose penalty, inflict penalty, inflict punishment, pass sentence on, penalize, prescribe punishment, pronounce judgment, pronounce sentence, punire, reprimand, reprove, sentence, subject to penalty, take disciplinary action

condemn

(Seize), verb accroach, acquire, arrogate, assume, assume ownership, attach, compullorily acquire, confiscate, declare to be forfeited, deprive of corporal possession, deprive of ownership, disentitle, disseise, distrain, divest of property, expropriate, foreclose, impound, impropriate, municipalize, nationalize, publicare, sequestrate, take for public use, take over, take possession, usurp
Associated concepts: eminent domain
See also: accuse, blame, cavil, censure, charge, complain, confiscate, convict, criticize, decry, defame, denigrate, denounce, discommend, disparage, execute, fault, impeach, incriminate, judge, libel, proscribe, punish, reprehend, reprimand, reproach, sentence

condemn

to pronounce judicial sentence on someone, usually one of death.
References in classic literature ?
Before it had set in dark on the night of his condemnation, he had travelled thus far on his last way.
He left the apartment hastily as he uttered these words, and the Preceptor followed, to watch and confirm him in his resolution; for in Bois-Guilbert's fame he had himself a strong interest, expecting much advantage from his being one day at the head of the Order, not to mention the preferment of which Mont-Fitchet had given him hopes, on condition he would forward the condemnation of the unfortunate Rebecca.
I burnt it, for fear that even a fragment should remain; for that letter must have led to your condemnation.
Machiavelli's strong condemnation of conspiracies may get its edge from his own very recent experience (February 1513), when he had been arrested and tortured for his alleged complicity in the Boscoli conspiracy.
He did not pass such thoughts without severe condemnation of himself.
Political judgments are generally vain formalities, for the same passions which give rise to the accusation ordain to the condemnation.
Not that charity only which causes us to help the needy and comfort the suffering, but that feeling of universal philanthropy which, by teaching us to love, causes us to judge with lenity all men; striking at the root of self-righteousness, and warning us to be sparing of our condemnation of others, while our own salvation is not yet secure.
Neither is the moral justification or condemnation of conduct aimed at here.
She was ashamed of herself for her gloom of the night, based on nothing more tangible than a sense of condemnation under an arbitrary law of society which had no foundation in Nature.
New York was inexorable in its condemnation of business irregularities.
Her companion's discourse now sunk from its hitherto animated pitch to nothing more than a short decisive sentence of praise or condemnation on the face of every woman they met; and Catherine, after listening and agreeing as long as she could, with all the civility and deference of the youthful female mind, fearful of hazarding an opinion of its own in opposition to that of a self-assured man, especially where the beauty of her own sex is concerned, ventured at length to vary the subject by a question which had been long uppermost in her thoughts; it was, "Have you ever read Udolpho, Mr.
When it is considered that the laying of this corner-stone took place in the heart of the South, in the "Black Belt," in the centre of that part of our country that was most devoted to slavery; that at that time slavery had been abolished only about sixteen years; that only sixteen years before no Negro could be taught from books without the teacher receiving the condemnation of the law or of public sentiment--when all this is considered, the scene that was witnessed on that spring day at Tuskegee was a remarkable one.