confederacy

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Confederacy

The association or banding together of two or more persons for the purpose of committing an act or furthering an enterprise that is forbidden by law, or that, though lawful in itself, becomes unlawful when made the object of the confederacy. More commonly called a conspiracy. The union of two or more independent states for the purpose of common safety or a furtherance of their mutual goals.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

confederacy

a combination of groups or individuals for unlawful purposes.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

CONFEDERACY, intern. law. An agreement between two or more states or nations, by which they unite for their mutual protection and good. This term is applied to such agreement between two independent nations, but it is used to signify the union of different states of the same nation, as the confederacy of the states.
     2. The original thirteen states, in 1781, adopted for their federal government the "Articles of confederation and perpetual union between the States," which continued in force until the present constitution of the United States went into full operation, on the 30th day of April, 1789, when president Washington was sworn into office. Vide 1 Story on the Const. B. 2, c. 3 and 4.

CONFEDERACY, crim. law. An agreement between two or more persons to do an unlawful act, or an act, which though not unlawful in itself, becomes so by the confederacy. The technical term usually employed to signify this offence, is conspiracy. (q.v.)

CONFEDERACY, equity pleading. The fourth part of a bill in chancery usually charges a confederacy; this is either general or special.
     2. The first is by alleging a general charge of confederacy between the defendants and other persons to injure or defraud the plaintiff. The common form of the charge is, that the defendants, combining and confederating together, to and with divers other persons as yet to the plaintiff unknown, but whose names, when discovered, he prays may be inserted in the bill, and they be made parties thereto, with proper and apt words to charge them with the premises, in order to injure and oppress the plaintiff in ti e premises, do absolutely refuse, &c. Mitf. Eq. Pl. by Jeremy, 40; Coop. Eq. Pl. 9 Story, Eq. Pl. Sec. 29; 1 Mont. Eq. Pl. 77; Barton, Suit in Eq. 33; Van Heyth. Eq. Drafts, 4.
     3. When it is intended to rely on a confederacy or combination as a ground of equitable jurisdiction, the confederacy must be specially charged to justify an assumption of jurisdiction. Mitf. Eq. Pl. by Jeremy, 41; Story, Eq. Pl. Sec. 30.
     4. A general allegation of confederacy is now considered as mere form. Story, Eq. Pl. Sec. 29; 4 Bouv. Inst. n. 4169.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
The decision-making process that led the governor to cancel Confederate Railroad's scheduled performance at the Du Quoin State Fair began weeks before news of the decision was made public.
Different proportions of reciprocity induction (ascending or descending) should be presented during conditions in which no earnings (or tokens) are provided for placing pieces in any of the two puzzles, compared to conditions in which the participants receive larger or smaller earnings for responding in a confederate's puzzle.
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The underlying narrative put forth by Antifa--that the Confederate memorials are racist symbols of racist men and that anyone who offers any defense of them is a racist and a Nazi--is false.
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Roof's apparent racist motivations drew attention to the fact that the Confederate battle flag still flew on South Carolina's State House grounds and that Confederate flag memorabilia was available for purchase from stores and online vendors.

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