confess

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confess

v. in criminal law, to voluntarily state that one is guilty of a criminal offense. This admission may be made to a law enforcement officer or in court either prior to or upon arrest, or after the person is charged with a specific crime. A confession must be truly voluntary (not forced by threat, torture, or trickery) and cannot be admitted in trial unless the defendant has been given the so-called Miranda warnings at the time of arrest or when it is clear he/she is the prime suspect, all based on the 5th Amendment prohibition against self-incrimination. The Miranda warnings are: the right to remain silent, the right to have an attorney present and that one can be appointed, and that his/her statements may be used against the defendant in court. (See: confession, Miranda warning, self-incrimination, Bill of Rights)

References in periodicals archive ?
Summerhill was self confessedly an 'island' separate and removed from the community around it, and is included here merely as an example of agency in the socialisation process, a deliberate effort to produce a generation of children that embody the mutual interdependence of which Dewey wrote.
This echoing of God's Word enables Dante to transcend his own human limits in making his poem the mouthpiece of a moral authority beyond his own confessedly sinful self.
But his consciousness before the act is nothing but the sum total of his past experience which is confessedly inadequate to the present emergency.
Margalit and Walzer first observe the disparity just mentioned, that Kasher and Yadlin, though confessedly preoccupied with war against terrorist groups, derive their approach from very general premises about the invariant duties of states toward certain types of individuals--regardless of the kind of conflict involved.
In Erie, Justice Brandeis explained that federal courts were displacing state law without any identifiable sovereign interest in doing so, a thing Congress "confessedly" could not do.
While the possible contributors and factors of the constantly changing business environment could be endlessly listed, there is still one, which simply cannot be left out, not even from this confessedly limited list: the constant need for innovation.
body, substance, monad, confessedly setting aside some otherwise central questions in other fields of Leibniz's interests like theodicy, necessity, logic, etc.
at 346 (reasoning that "[e]ven in compositions confessedly literary, [an] author may not intend ...
Likewise, I think, the younger Lissitzky also remained loyal not only to the basic artistic principles but also to the elevated artistic attitude of his teacher, even as he became a first-generation Constructivist, aware that confessedly 'materialist' Constructivism had an axe to grind against anything so unapologetically metaphysical as a mode of useless abstract painting making embarrassingly spiritual claims.
Causation is just "passing powers around." It is a confessedly circular theory: causation is explained in terms of powers; powers in terms of dispositions (causes) towards some types of manifestations (effects).
Our marriage laws are confessedly imperfect, and open to hair breadth escapes, which offer a fascinating complication, not devoid of probability." (104) Margaret Oliphant likewise noted the jurisprudential context, accusing Braddon in particular of having "brought in the reign of bigamy as an interesting and fashionable crime," adding "which no doubt shows a certain deference to the British relish for law and order." She continued casting a very pointed aspersion: "It goes against the seventh commandment, no doubt, but does it in a legitimate sort of way, and is an invention which could only have been possible to an Englishwoman knowing the attraction of impropriety, and yet loving the shelter of law." (105)
Supposing that destiny, or interest, or chance, or what you will, has united a man, confessedly of a weak understanding, and corporeal debility, to a woman strong in the powers of intellect, and capable of bearing the fatigues of busy life: is it not degrading to humanity that such a woman should be the passive, and obedient slave, of such an husband?