conformist

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The manifold sources of this conformism are identified by Elena Omelchenko and Guzel Sabirova as first, the "Soviet legacy"; second, a "patriotic education"; and third, specific "Russian" interpretations of global patterns of youth culture (253).
It identifies and unfolds three distinct stories professionals activate when accounting for client inauthenticity: (1) the story of institutional conformism, (2) the story of ulterior motives, and (3) the story of disorders.
Respect for dogma--emotional dependency, conformism excessively authoritarian tendencies can lead to dogmatism which opposes any innovative process
He said the author offers his own vision of harmony based on a troika: taking humans as a foundation, social justice and equality, and amidst conformism, a respect for individual choice.
However, the problem rests in the conformism that everyone wants.
Other threats are conformism and political fear on the part of the voters, especially the ones that belong to marginalized groups and ethnic minorities.
Whether earning honest money, as one peasant-turned-photographer did, or pushing drugs (ketamine is in great favor), selling sex, or just getting by as a hunzi ("slacker"), these outsiders must amount to a million pinpricks weakening control, conformism, and Confucianism.
Now, however, after the "anthropological revolution" of the 1960s, in which human bonds tying one to others and to oneself were transformed into a bond fabricated by consumption and the industries of information and diversion, marginality has become conformism and exclusion, which creates a fertile soil for depression.
That was the heyday of the classical nation-state: A national state, homogenous as far as possible, which at most tolerated its minorities or persecuted them outright, that demanded national conformism within and made little pretense of morality in its dealing with other nation-states.
The second viscount (also Anthony Browne) was emphatically not inclined to his grandfather's compromise and conformism, yet even after the Powder Plot and his refusal to take the Oath of Allegiance in 1611, he remained active in local and occasionally higher-level politics (though he prudently absented himself from the House of Lords until 1621), and his entourage provided "a forum for debates about the future of the Catholic community in England" (287).
Literature, finally, demands economic choice because it offers a selection among "various options of consumption" (187) as represented by the "economic categories of surplus" in the biblical Psalms, by the "faithlessness to the creditor" God in Moliere's Don Juan, and by the choice among "the possibilities of individuality in the era of social revolution and mass conformism at the end of the age of laissez-faire liberalism" (204) forced upon us by Kafka's "Das Urteil.
This study shows that the suppression of established satirical forms was symptomatic of the move towards absolutist government, and that civilitY, ideological conformism, and overt pedagogical value became prized more in comic performances than humour, engaged debate, and social commentary.