defect

(redirected from congenital heart defect)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Defect

Imperfection, flaw, or deficiency.

That which is subject to a defect is missing a requisite element and, therefore, is not legally binding. Defective Service of Process, for example, is service that does not comply with a procedural or jurisdictional requirement. A defective will is one that has not been properly drawn up, has been obtained by unlawful means, or does not comply with a particular law. In some cases, however, defects can be cured; for example, defective service of process can be cured by the service of an amended complaint.

In Product Liability, a defective product is one that cannot be used for the purposes intended or is made dangerous as a result of a flaw or imperfection. Such a defect might exist in the entire design of a product or in the production of a particular individual product. A latent defect is one that is not readily observable by the buyer of an item, whereas a patent defect is obvious or immediately apparent upon observation.

A fatal defect is one that, due to its serious nature, serves to nullify a contract.

defect

n. an imperfection, quite often so great that the machinery or written document cannot be used. A car that will not run or has faulty brakes has a defect, and so does a deed in which a party who signed the deed to give over property did not have title to the property. There are also minor defects, like scratches that only lessen value, but do not make an object useless. (See: defective, defective title)

defect

in the law of tort or delict, a defect exists if the safety of the product is not such as persons generally are entitled to expect. In terms of the Consumer Protection Act 1987, defect is further explained as involving an examination of all the circumstances, including: the manner in which, and purposes for which, the product has been marketed; its get-up; the use of any mark in relation to the product and any instructions for, or warnings with respect to, doing or refraining from doing anything with or in relation to the product; what might reasonably be expected to be done with or in relation to the product; and the time when the product was supplied by its producer to another. Even if a product is defective, that is not enough to establish liability, particularly in light of the defences available.

DEFECT. The want of something required by law.
     2. It is a general rule that pleadings shall have these two requisites; 1. A matter sufficient in law. 2. That it be deduced and expressed according to the forms of law. The want of either of these is a defect.
     3. Defects in matters of substance cannot be cured, because it does not appear that the plaintiff is entitled to recover; but when the defects are in matter of form, they are cured by a verdict in favor of the party who committed them. 3 Bouv. Inst. n. 3292; 2 Wash. 1; 1 Hen. & Munf. 153; 16 Pick. 128, 541; 1 Day, 315; 4 Conn, 190; 5 Conn. 416; 6 Conn. 176; 12 Conn. 455; 1 P. C. C. R. 76; 2 Green, 133; 4 Blackf. 107; 2 M'Lean, 35; Bac. Ab. Verdict, X.

References in periodicals archive ?
Developmental concerns among children with congenital heart defects may start as early as infancy but often become more of a problem in middle childhood or adolescence.
Major finding: Of 71 Georgia hospitals surveyed, 22 (31%) were screening newborns for congenital heart defects, compared with 100% of the 11 hospitals surveyed in New Jersey.
Pale type congenital heart defects with arteriovenous shunt: defect of interventricular septum (IVSD), defect of interatrial septum (IASD), open arterial duct (OAD); open atrioventricular canal (AVC);
Indeed, congenital heart defects are the most common form of birth defects.
KARACHI -- Since the turn of the millennium, child deaths associated with congenital heart defects in Pakistan have been declining thanks to improve public health and poverty reduction efforts.
After excluding women who had diabetes before pregnancy or who developed it during pregnancy, the results showed that the risk of giving birth to a child with a congenital heart defect was elevated by 8 percent for every increase of 10 milligrams per deciliter in blood glucose levels in the early stages of pregnancy.
A new study in EHP explores women's exposure to high heat during early pregnancy as a possible risk factor for congenital heart defects in their babies.
Majdalany adds that potential complications differ depending on the type of congenital heart defect, its severity or complexity, and when it was treated.
Some types of CHD are grouped into Major congenital heart defect (MCHD) defined as a complex structural malformation of the heart and/ or the great arteries, and/or the presence of a defect requiring surgical or catheter intervention within the first 6 months of life.5
But there are now more than 20 years of data that point toward a larger role for folic acid in preventing common, and in some cases devastating, congenital heart defects.
RARE SURGERY: Mohammed Shareef, with his week-old daughter who was operated on for a congenital heart defect in a rare kind of heart surgery in Makkah.
A total of two hundred consecutive patients of 18 years or above with a diagnosis of structural congenital heart defect were included in the study.

Full browser ?