consanguinity

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Consanguinity

Blood relationship; the relation of people who descend from the same ancestor.

Consanguinity is the basis of the laws that govern such matters as rules of Descent and Distribution of property, the degree of relation between which marriage is prohibited under the laws concerning Incest, and a basis for the determination of who may serve as a witness.

Lineal consanguinity is the relation in a direct line—such as between parent, child, and grandparent. It may be determined either upward—as in the case of son, father, grandfather—or downward—as in son, grandson, great-grandson.

Collateral consanguinity is a more remote relationship describing people who are related by a common ancestor but do not descend from each other—such as cousins who have the same grandparents.

Consanguinity is not the same as affinity, which is a close relation based on marriage rather than on common ancestry.

consanguinity

the relationship of persons descended from the same ancestor. Thus sons are consanguine with their fathers, brothers with each other. See AFFINITY.

CONSANGUINITY. The relation subsisting among all the different persons descending from the same stock, or common ancestor. Vaughan, 322, 329; 2 Bl. Com. 202 Toull. Dr. Civ.. Fr. liv. 3, t. 1, ch. n 115 2 Bouv. Inst. n. 1955, et seq.
     2. Some portion of the blood of the common ancestor flows through the veins of all his descendants, and though mixed with the blood flowing from many other families, yet it constitutes the kindred or alliance by blood between any two of the individuals. This relation by blood is of two kinds, lineal and collateral.
     3. Lineal consanguinity is that relation which exists among persons, where one is descended from the other, as between the son and the father, or the grandfather, and so upwards in a direct ascending line; and between the father and the son, or the grandson, and so downwards in a direct descending line. Every generation in this direct course males a degree, computing either in the ascending or descending line. This being the natural mode of computing the degrees of lineal, consanguinity, it has been adopted by the civil, the canon, and the common law.
     4. Collateral consanguinity is the relation subsisting among persons who descend from the same common ancestor, but not from each other. It is essential to constitute this relation, that they spring from the same common root or stock, but in different branches. The mode of computing the degrees is to discover the common ancestor, to begin with him to reckon downwards, and the degree the two persons, or the more remote of them, is distant from the ancestor, is the degree of kindred subsisting between them. For instance, two brothers are related to each other in the first degree, because from the father to each of them is one degree. An uncle and a nephew are related to each other in tho second degree, because the nephew is two degrees distant from the common ancestor, and the rule of computation is extended to the remotest degrees of collateral relationship. This is the mode of computation by the common and canon law. The method of computing by the civil law, is to begin at either of the persons in question and count up to the common ancestor, and then downwards to the, other person, calling it a degree for each person, both ascending and descending, and the degrees they stand from each other is the degree in which they stand related. Thus, from a nephew to his father, is one degree; to the grandfather, two degrees and then to the uncle, three; which points out the relationship.
     5. The following table, in which the Roman numeral letters express the degrees by the civil law, and those in Arabic figures at the bottom, those by the common law, will fully illustrate the subject.

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³          IV.       ³
³Great grand-father's³
³        father      ³
³           4        ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ
     ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ III. ³ ³ V. ³ ³ Great grand-father ³ ³Great grand-uncle³ ³ 3. ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ
     ³ \ ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ II. ³ ³ IV. ³ ³ Grand father ³ ³ Great uncle. ³ ³ 2. ³ ³ 3 ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ
     ³ \ ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ I. ³ ³ III. ³ ³ V. ³ ³ ³ ³ Father ³ ³ Uncle. ³ ³Great Uncle's son³ ³ 1. ³ ³ 2. ³ ³ 3. ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ
     ³ \ \ ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ ³ ³ II. ³ ³ IV. ³ ³ VI. ³ ³Intestate person ³ ³ Brother ³ ³ Cousin german ³ ³ 2nd. Cousin³ ³ proposed. ³ ³ 1 ³ ³ 2 ³ ³ 3 ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ
     ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ I. ³ ³ III. ³ ³ V. ³ ³ Son. ³ ³ Nephew ³ ³Son of Cousin³ ³ 1. ³ ³ 2 ³ ³ german 3 ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ
     ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ II. ³ ³ IV. ³ ³ Grandson. ³ ³Son of Nephew or ³ ³ 2. ³ ³brother's grandson³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ ³ 3 ³
     ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ III. ³ ³ Great grandson. ³ ³ 3. ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ



     6. The mode of the civil law is preferable, for it points out the actual degree of kindred in all cases; by the mode adopted by the common law, different relations may stand in the same degree. The uncle and nephew stand related in the second degree by the common law, and so are two first cousins, or two sons of two brothers; but by the civil law the uncle and nephew are in the third degree, and the cousins are in the fourth. The mode of computation, however, is immaterial, for both will establish the same person to be the heir. 2 Bl. Com. 202; 1 Swift's Dig. 113; Toull. Civ. Fr. liv. 8, t. 1, o. 3, n. 115. Vide Branch; Degree; Line.

References in periodicals archive ?
We have found a family from north of the country (Turkman ethnicity), in which asymptomatic consanguine parents had more than one mutations, E148Q/P369S and P369S/E148Q/A744S for the mother and father, respectively.
The decline of ovarian function in young women, a common infertility issue, is linked to vitamin D deficiency, and in Arab women specifically, the decline is the result of being daughters from consanguine parents or parents who are related.
In the savage group it was the consanguine family; during barbarism it rested on the gens, the tribe or the confederation of tribes.
30% des cas sont d'origine consanguine. Le Professeur Farid Hadoum, du service nephrologie du CHU Nafissa-Hamoud, a evoque la maladie de Fabry, meconnue en Algerie et pour laquelle il suspecte au minimum 300 cas non diagnostiques.
The Nubs clan was an example of one of these lines, which would create an important link between Gyaltsa, and a consanguine link to Tropu Lotsawa's, a yoke with a hereditary line of historic prominence in Tibet.
One is the keen interest Marx took in the radically democratic, communist content of the indigenous commons in a comparatively trans-cultural context: 'Communism in living seems to have originated in the necessities of the consanguine family, to have been continued in the punaluan, and transmitted to the syndyasmian unter d.
Shortley is forced, through the binary logic of Jim Crow, to view them as consanguine whites leagued against a black "other." If the DPs do not pollute whiteness, she reasons, they may actually concentrate it through the elimination of the South's traditional "others." This thought is amplified into something of a messianic fantasy moments later when one of the farm's remaining peacocks unfurls its multicolored tail from a tree near Mrs.
Patterns of settlement are based on a political and territorial division of consanguine groups, resulting in the appropriation of distinct micro- ecosystems, which means access to food resources.
Research has highlighted multiple factors that contribute to women's vulnerability to contracting HIV/AIDS: concurrent partnering, absence of male circumcision, poverty, the low status of women, lack of condom use, prevalence of untreated STIs (sexually transmitted infections), early sexual initiation and certain cultural practices, such as widow inheritance (forced consanguine marriage to an infected man or woman) and the preference for male children, among other things.
The Muslim tendency for consanguine marriage suggests at the very least a subconscious effort to maintain their genetic as well as their religious distance from non-Muslims (Bundey et al., 1990; Tadmouri et al., 2009).