consanguinity


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Related to consanguinity: amorousness, demureness, Consanguinity table

Consanguinity

Blood relationship; the relation of people who descend from the same ancestor.

Consanguinity is the basis of the laws that govern such matters as rules of Descent and Distribution of property, the degree of relation between which marriage is prohibited under the laws concerning Incest, and a basis for the determination of who may serve as a witness.

Lineal consanguinity is the relation in a direct line—such as between parent, child, and grandparent. It may be determined either upward—as in the case of son, father, grandfather—or downward—as in son, grandson, great-grandson.

Collateral consanguinity is a more remote relationship describing people who are related by a common ancestor but do not descend from each other—such as cousins who have the same grandparents.

Consanguinity is not the same as affinity, which is a close relation based on marriage rather than on common ancestry.

See: affiliation, affinity, ancestry, association, blood, bloodline, connection, contact, degree, family, kinship, propinquity, relation, relationship

consanguinity

the relationship of persons descended from the same ancestor. Thus sons are consanguine with their fathers, brothers with each other. See AFFINITY.

CONSANGUINITY. The relation subsisting among all the different persons descending from the same stock, or common ancestor. Vaughan, 322, 329; 2 Bl. Com. 202 Toull. Dr. Civ.. Fr. liv. 3, t. 1, ch. n 115 2 Bouv. Inst. n. 1955, et seq.
     2. Some portion of the blood of the common ancestor flows through the veins of all his descendants, and though mixed with the blood flowing from many other families, yet it constitutes the kindred or alliance by blood between any two of the individuals. This relation by blood is of two kinds, lineal and collateral.
     3. Lineal consanguinity is that relation which exists among persons, where one is descended from the other, as between the son and the father, or the grandfather, and so upwards in a direct ascending line; and between the father and the son, or the grandson, and so downwards in a direct descending line. Every generation in this direct course males a degree, computing either in the ascending or descending line. This being the natural mode of computing the degrees of lineal, consanguinity, it has been adopted by the civil, the canon, and the common law.
     4. Collateral consanguinity is the relation subsisting among persons who descend from the same common ancestor, but not from each other. It is essential to constitute this relation, that they spring from the same common root or stock, but in different branches. The mode of computing the degrees is to discover the common ancestor, to begin with him to reckon downwards, and the degree the two persons, or the more remote of them, is distant from the ancestor, is the degree of kindred subsisting between them. For instance, two brothers are related to each other in the first degree, because from the father to each of them is one degree. An uncle and a nephew are related to each other in tho second degree, because the nephew is two degrees distant from the common ancestor, and the rule of computation is extended to the remotest degrees of collateral relationship. This is the mode of computation by the common and canon law. The method of computing by the civil law, is to begin at either of the persons in question and count up to the common ancestor, and then downwards to the, other person, calling it a degree for each person, both ascending and descending, and the degrees they stand from each other is the degree in which they stand related. Thus, from a nephew to his father, is one degree; to the grandfather, two degrees and then to the uncle, three; which points out the relationship.
     5. The following table, in which the Roman numeral letters express the degrees by the civil law, and those in Arabic figures at the bottom, those by the common law, will fully illustrate the subject.

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³          IV.       ³
³Great grand-father's³
³        father      ³
³           4        ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ
     ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ III. ³ ³ V. ³ ³ Great grand-father ³ ³Great grand-uncle³ ³ 3. ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ
     ³ \ ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ II. ³ ³ IV. ³ ³ Grand father ³ ³ Great uncle. ³ ³ 2. ³ ³ 3 ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ
     ³ \ ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ I. ³ ³ III. ³ ³ V. ³ ³ ³ ³ Father ³ ³ Uncle. ³ ³Great Uncle's son³ ³ 1. ³ ³ 2. ³ ³ 3. ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ
     ³ \ \ ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ ³ ³ II. ³ ³ IV. ³ ³ VI. ³ ³Intestate person ³ ³ Brother ³ ³ Cousin german ³ ³ 2nd. Cousin³ ³ proposed. ³ ³ 1 ³ ³ 2 ³ ³ 3 ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ
     ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ I. ³ ³ III. ³ ³ V. ³ ³ Son. ³ ³ Nephew ³ ³Son of Cousin³ ³ 1. ³ ³ 2 ³ ³ german 3 ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ
     ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ II. ³ ³ IV. ³ ³ Grandson. ³ ³Son of Nephew or ³ ³ 2. ³ ³brother's grandson³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ ³ 3 ³
     ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ III. ³ ³ Great grandson. ³ ³ 3. ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ



     6. The mode of the civil law is preferable, for it points out the actual degree of kindred in all cases; by the mode adopted by the common law, different relations may stand in the same degree. The uncle and nephew stand related in the second degree by the common law, and so are two first cousins, or two sons of two brothers; but by the civil law the uncle and nephew are in the third degree, and the cousins are in the fourth. The mode of computation, however, is immaterial, for both will establish the same person to be the heir. 2 Bl. Com. 202; 1 Swift's Dig. 113; Toull. Civ. Fr. liv. 8, t. 1, o. 3, n. 115. Vide Branch; Degree; Line.

References in periodicals archive ?
As to the degree of consanguinity, there was a tie between coverage up to second degree and up to fourth degree and one vote for third degree.
According to Hank Pellissier of the Institute of Ethics and Emerging Technologies, consanguinity is a deeply rooted cultural preference among one-fifth of the world population mostly in the Middle East, Asia and North Africa.
While lifestyle and eating habits are two critical factors that have led to an increase in infertility with the local age group between age 20 and 30, consanguinity is another very important reason for the increase in such cases among the Emirati population," said Professor Dr Human Fatemi, subspecialist, Reproductive Medicine and Reproductive Surgery, and medical director of IVI Middle East Fertility Clinic.
Parental consanguinity (both parents being first cousins) was established through self-report and DNA testing.
A history of consanguinity was present in 48 patients (40%).
20 percent of couples with infertility and 25 percent of couples with RPL had a consanguineous marriage which makes us suspicious about relation between RPL and consanguinity.
Wikipedia defines consanguinity as "the property of being from the same kinship as another person.
Those trade and economic links were also reinforced by social and cultural consanguinity with FATA tribes, the committee recommendations said.
Rates of abortion, termination and still births are found to be higher among females having consanguineous marriages The data also showed limited access or permission to have consultation in consanguineous marriages as most of the respondents do not even fulfill the standard criteria of antenatal visits during pregnancy Such study concludes that in Pakistan, consanguinity not only contributes to the negative effects on maternal and child health but also reinforces adoption of past and outdated behavior patterns among the masses.
2) It is widely perceived that consanguinity is more prevalent among the underprivileged in the society.
1] Consanguinity has been defined as the marriage or union between people of the same blood, which has decreased heavily in most of the developed countries.