consecutiveness


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
See: continuity
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
One can conclude that linear changes in the frequency of impulse consecutiveness with fixed amplitude does not lead to distinct perception either of approach or withdrawal.
My analysis has three goals: (1) to highlight the significance and some of the limitations of the metaphor of travel in narrative theory and textual analysis; (2) to rethink some of the identifying traits and expectations of travel writing through concepts of temporality, causality, and narrative experientiality as they are developed in narrative theory; (3) to extend cognitive-linguistic research on metaphors into the specifics of narrative form, specifically the issue of the relation between consecutiveness and consequence in travel narratives.
Perhaps the most significant of the many cogent points in the article is his suggestion that the construction indicates not only temporal consecutiveness, as Disterhaft has proposed, but also a causal and/or logical consecutiveness, which he suggests can be translated by "thereupon," "daraufhin.
Such non-retrograde rhythm, Darbyshire notes, superimposes "eternity" on time, and in this Messiaen--in appealing "to ancient rhythmic principles and the general truths which he believed they contained established a link in his music between science and a primordiality" (33)--is following Aquinas's definition of eternity as "characterized by the absence of consecutiveness (of 'a before and an after')" (Darbyshire, 38).
In the first stage of life the mind is frivolous and easily distracted, it misses progress by failing in consecutiveness and persistence.
undermine the inherent consecutiveness of language, frustrating the reader's normal expectation of a sequence and forcing him [or her] to perceive the elements of the poem as juxtaposed in space rather than unfolding in time.
sharpen their wits, give acuteness to their perceptions and consecutiveness and clearness to their reasoning powers.
Balzac's narrator knows that the successive mechanics of language will prove him right; the arrogance of the writer-protagonist of "La muse du departement" is counting on the inertia of the account to assure the consequentiality or the consecutiveness that the interruption puts in question.
Cheever's adolescent fixations, his "damaged consecutiveness of growth," appear in various contexts.

Full browser ?