consent

(redirected from consenter)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

Consent

Voluntary Acquiescence to the proposal of another; the act or result of reaching an accord; a concurrence of minds; actual willingness that an act or an infringement of an interest shall occur.

Consent is an act of reason and deliberation. A person who possesses and exercises sufficient mental capacity to make an intelligent decision demonstrates consent by performing an act recommended by another. Consent assumes a physical power to act and a reflective, determined, and unencumbered exertion of these powers. It is an act unaffected by Fraud, duress, or sometimes even mistake when these factors are not the reason for the consent. Consent is implied in every agreement.

Parties who terminate litigation pursuant to a consent judgment agree to the terms of a decision that is entered into the court record subsequent to its approval by the court.

In the context of rape, submission due to apprehension or terror is not real consent. There must be a choice between resistance and acquiescence. If a woman resists to the point where additional resistance would be futile or until her resistance is forcibly overcome, submission thereafter is not consent.

consent

1) n. a voluntary agreement to another's proposition. 2) v. to voluntarily agree to an act or proposal of another, which may range from contracts to sexual relations.

consent

agreement with another on the same matter.
1 a defence to a civil action for assault.
2 a defence to some criminal charges but not murder.
3 an essential element in the formation of a contract.
4 an essential element in the formation of a marriage.

CONSENT. An agreement to something proposed, and differs from assent. (q.v.) Wolff, Ins. Nat. part 1, SSSS 27-30; Pard. Dr. Com. part 2, tit. 1, n. 1, 38 to 178. Consent supposes, 1. a physical power to act; 2. a moral power of acting; 3. a serious, determined, and free use of these powers. Fonb. Eq. B; 1, c. 2, s. 1; Grot. de Jure Belli et Pacis, lib. 2, c. 11, s. 6.
     2. Consent is either express or implied. Express, when it is given viva voce, or in writing; implied, when it is manifested by signs, actions, or facts, or by inaction or silence, which raise a presumption that the consent has been given.
     3. - 1. When a legacy is given with a condition annexed to the bequest, requiring the consent of executors to the marriage of the legatee, and under such consent being given, a mutual attachment has been suffered to grow up, it would be rather late to state terms and conditions on which a marriage between the parties should take place;. 2 Ves. & Beames, 234; Ambl. 264; 2 Freem. 201; unless such consent was obtained by deceit or fraud. 1 Eden, 6; 1 Phillim. 200; 12 Ves. 19.
     4. - 2. Such a condition does not apply to a second marriage. 3 Bro. C. C. 145; 3 Ves. 239.
     5. - 3. If the consent has been substantially given, though not modo et forma, the legatee will be held duly entitled to the legacy. 1 Sim. & Stu. 172; 1 Meriv. 187; 2 Atk. 265.
     6. - 4. When trustees under a marriage settlement are empowered to sell "with the consent of the husband and, wife," a sale made by the trustees without the distinct consent of the wife, cannot be a due execution of their power. 10 Ves. 378.
     7. - 5. Where a power of sale requires that the sale should be with the consent of certain specified individuals, the fact of such consent having been given, ought to be evinced in the manner pointed out by the creator of the power, or such power will not be considered as properly executed. 10 Ves. 308. Vide, generally, 2 Supp. to Ves. jr. 161, 165, 169; Ayliffe's Pand. 117; 1 Rob. Leg.. 345, 539.
     8. - 6. Courts of equity have established the rule, that when the true owner of property stands by, and knowingly suffers a stranger to sell the same as his own, without objection, this will be such implied consent as to render the sale valid against the true owner. Story on Ag. Sec. 91 Story on Eq. Jur. Sec. 385 to 390. And courts of law, unless restrained by technical formalities, act upon the principles of justice; as, for example, when a man permitted, without objection, the sale of his goods under an execution against another person. 6 Adolph. & El 11. 469 9 Barn. & Cr. 586; 3 Barn. & Adolph. 318, note.
     9. The consent which is implied in every agreement is excluded, 1. By error in the essentials of the contract; ,is, if Paul, in the city of Philadelphia, buy the horse of Peter, which is in Boston, and promise to pay one hundred dollars for him, the horse at the time of the sale, unknown to either party, being dead. This decision is founded on the rule that he who consents through error does not consent at all; non consentiunt qui errant. Dig. 2, 1, 15; Dig. lib. 1, tit. ult. 1. 116, Sec. 2. 2. Consent is excluded by duress of the party making the agreement. 3. Consent is never given so as to bind the parties, when it is obtained by fraud. 4. It cannot be given by a person who has no understanding, as an idiot, nor by one who, though possessed of understanding, is not in law capable of making a contract, as a feme covert. See Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.

References in periodicals archive ?
On almost every account, the demands of consenting in a way that make the consenter morally responsible depend on situational factors that vary with context.
(165) The feminist alternative advocated by Raigrodski empowers the consenter rather than maintaining existing power disparities.
Maggie was certainly a consenter, who adhered to the literal interpretation of the requirements.
to the consenters. It cannot be achieved without the consenter's
(33) Under Schneckloth a consenter does not have to be informed of his right to refuse to consent.
Locke placed important qualifications on tacit consent by residency; according to Locke, tacit consenters of is type have a considerably narrower obligation to obey than express consenters.
It would mean police cannot target minorities by stopping them on the public streets, and then intimidating them into agreeing to a search of their car--a search that only rarely yields incriminating evidence, but almost always leaves the consenter feeling diminished and angry.
Why should anyone surrender to the police, perhaps without a whimper, an interest recognized both practically and legally to be of the first order and often resulting in the discovery of evidence which incriminates the consenter?" Daniel L.
The decision did not consider what would be reasonable when a third party was involved.(117) In Rodriguez, however, the Court not only dealt with suspicion as to the individual defendant's guilt, but also considered questions regarding the honesty of the consenter. As a result, the Court has added a greater risk to the Fourth Amendment calculus.
(124) Even though consent was by a third party in Schneckloth, the defendant who voluntarily occupied the car with the consenter can be considered to have authorized other passengers to consent to a search under Matlock and Katz.
([dagger]) lncidence per 106 person-years of observation, adjusted for nonconsenters and missing blood cultures among eligible consenters.