contrivances


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You see," said the Captain, "I use Bunsen's contrivances, not Ruhmkorff's.
The contrast between the swift and complex movements of these contrivances and the inert panting clumsiness of their masters was acute, and for days I had to tell myself repeatedly that these latter were indeed the living of the two things.
Oh, I may take a look at it again by-and-by,' she says indifferently, but nevertheless the probability is that as the door shuts the book opens, as if by some mechanical contrivance.
And here I must pause, to point out to you the short-sightedness of human contrivance.
It may seem to you rather a blundering contrivance for a clever young man to bury the guineas.
I made my humblest acknowledgment to this illustrious person, for his great communicativeness; and promised, "if ever I had the good fortune to return to my native country, that I would do him justice, as the sole inventor of this wonderful machine;" the form and contrivance of which I desired leave to delineate on paper, as in the figure here annexed.
The most sanguine advocates for three or four confederacies cannot reasonably suppose that they would long remain exactly on an equal footing in point of strength, even if it was possible to form them so at first; but, admitting that to be practicable, yet what human contrivance can secure the continuance of such equality?
Now as I stood and examined it, finding a pleasure in the mere touch of the contrivance, the thing I had expected happened.
Ten men would have found difficulty in moving that tub, but by some mechanical contrivance it had turned with the flagstone on which it rested.
He focuses on the theory of regularization, which was born in an attempt to eliminate the singularities in the equations of orbital motion, and is a collection of mathematical and dynamical contrivances that provide more adequate description of the dynamics.
Tenders are invited for Speed Recorder & Automatic Contrivances
But despite its complexities and contrivances, The Trial: A Murder In The Family (Channel 4, Sunday to Thursday) provided a fascinating few nights of television, opening up the world of the courtroom to millions of people.