conventionality


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Peru, (92) for example, the Court added a modification to conventionality control, determining that the "organs of the Judiciary" must carry it out "obviously, within the framework of their respective competences and of the corresponding procedural regulations.
The above discrepancy between an idealized concept of a conventional sense and its usage-driven profile points to a crucial question concerning the definition and function of conventionality in the process of meaning construction.
It is, moreover, the ironic revelation of the conventionality of cliches and commonsense truths that imparts a large part of the pleasure in Pelevin's books.
When she wanted a baby, she shunned the conventionality of a relationship and 'auditioned' potential fathers.
Hence, the early Beitrage zur Philosophie des Lebens (1780), trying out various forms, suggests paradigmatically not just that the 'fit' between literary form and life experience is only conventional, but also that the awareness of its mere conventionality immediately reveals aesthetic priorities (i.
Fiennes is Jack Tanner, confirmed bachelor and free-thinker, in denial over his love for Ann Whitefield (Juliet Stevenson) and vocally opposed to marriage, which he sees as an institution perpetuated by feminine artifice, tempting men into a lifetime of meaningless conventionality.
Weigel criticizes attempts to transfer evolutionary models to culture (like Dawkins's introduction of the unit Meme or Wilson's idea of genetic-cultural co-evolution), arguing that they can only describe cultural phenomena that display a high degree of conventionality and that they ignore the fact that cultural phenomena do not transfer and reproduce "from brain to brain" (Dawkins), but via verbal or symbolic media.
That's important, because conventionality begets conformity in some ways in excessive use," he said.
While The Indian Clerk is an examination of the architecture of human love, both platonic and erotic, on a deeper level it is also an indictment of conventionality in all of its forms.
Half-Jackie (Moody Marcus) is our amoral court jester, a wily and expert pickpocket, flaunting conventionality.
It is a world so lacking in imagination and so stifling to the individuals within it who dare to vary slightly that it would seem like a caricature of 1950s and early 1960s conventionality if not for Ludwig's honest, clear writing and patient, compassionate observations that render the characters and their insular world entirely believable.
Ironic, then, that "The Invasion," the fourth film to be made from the material, keels over dead, killed by Hollywood conventionality and bland uniformity.