conventionality


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The Court's adoption of the conventionality control raises both theoretical and practical problems.
The notion of conventionality is frequently evoked in conceptual models, which is probably related to its apparent role if establishing "primary" senses of linguistic units.
It is a world so lacking in imagination and so stifling to the individuals within it who dare to vary slightly that it would seem like a caricature of 1950s and early 1960s conventionality if not for Ludwig's honest, clear writing and patient, compassionate observations that render the characters and their insular world entirely believable.
Ironic, then, that "The Invasion," the fourth film to be made from the material, keels over dead, killed by Hollywood conventionality and bland uniformity.
Initially chilled as much by the conservatism and conventionality of their adopted city as by its frigid winter, Betty and Tony soon discovered congenial friends with whom to establish a progressive movement.
In re-enacting others through a genetic relationship of resemblance, and through the conventionality of the portrait photograph, the self-portraits suggest that we look at family photographs in order to know ourselves through the photographic trace left by the lost ancestral other.
THIS is a time to celebrate your son's faith in you rather than grieve for his lack of conventionality.
Yet the postmodernists brashly sought out anything new or different, as if to remove any odor of midcentury conventionality, even if that conventionality, as in Frankfurt School Marxism or in abstract expressionism, had been politically or aesthetically radical.
This does not remove it from the realm of reality or slot it into a mould which reeks of boredom, conventionality and routine.
The conventionality of this text works to the book's generic usefulness.
Citing an advantage to her relatively recent induction into the exciting field of development, Pisarra said that her initial inexperience gave her a fresh perspective on the business and helped her to avoid its entrenched inefficiencies as well as transcend conventionality.
His motto, "Make It New," is strongly expressed in his work, which is full of extravagant, attention-getting gesture, the opposite of the cool rationality of the Sarasota School but well worth considering here if our future downtown is to avoid stifling conventionality, modern or not.