conviction


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Conviction

The outcome of a criminal prosecution which concludes in a judgment that the defendant is guilty of the crime charged. The juncture of a criminal proceeding during which the question of guilt is ascertained. In a case where the perpetrator has been adjudged guilty and sentenced, a record of the summary proceedings brought pursuant to any penal statute before one or more justices of the peace or other properly authorized persons.

The terms conviction and convicted refer to the final judgment on a verdict of guilty, a plea of guilty, or a plea of nolo contendere. They do not include a final judgment that has been deleted by a pardon, set aside, reversed, or otherwise rendered inoperative.

The term summary conviction refers to the consequence of a trial before a court or magistrate, without a jury, which generally involves a minor misdemeanor.

conviction

n. the result of a criminal trial in which the defendant has been found guilty of a crime.

conviction

(Finding of guilt), noun adjudgment, aspersion, avengement, blame, censure, charge, condemnation, criminality, culpability, damnatio, damnation, decision, decree, decrial, denouncement, denunciation, exaction of penalty, execution of sentence, final condemnation, finding, hostile verdict, imposition, judgment, passing judgment, penalization, penalty, prescribed punishhent, proof of guilt, punishment, punition, reprehension, reprisal, reprobation, reproof, retribution, retributive justice, ruling, sentence, sentencing, unfavorable verdict, verdict
Associated concepts: certificate of conviction, criminal conniction, felony conviction, final conviction, guilty verdict, nolo cotendere plea, record of conviction, sentencing

conviction

(Persuasion), noun ascertained principle, assumption, assurance, assured belief, attitude, avowal, certitude, concept, conception, conclusion, credence, creed, declaration of faith, doctrine, dogma, faith, firm belief, fixed opinion, impression, judgment, leaning, mind, opinio, opinion, outlook, personal judgment, point of view, position, positiveness, postulation, posture, predilection, predisposition, presupposition, principle, proclivity, profession, propensity, rooted belief, sententia, sentiment, settled belief, settled judgment, standpoint, staunch belief, supposition, sureness, tenet, thinking, understanding, unshakable opinion, view, viewpoint, way of thinking, well-founded opinion
See also: belief, certainty, certification, certitude, condemnation, confidence, credence, determination, dogma, faith, idea, notion, opinion, principle, punishment, reliance, sentence, standpoint, surety, trust

conviction

a person is convicted of an offence if he pleads or is found guilty of that offence.

CONVICTION, practice. A condemnation. In its most extensive sense this word signifies the giving judgment against a defendant, whether criminal or civil. In a more limited sense, it means, the judgment given against the criminal. And in its most restricted sense it is a record of the summary proceedings upon any penal statute before one or more justices of the peace, or other persons duly authorized, in a case where the offender has been convicted and sentenced: this last is usually termed a summary conviction.
     2. As summary. convictions have been introduced in derogation of the common law, and operate to the exclusion of trial by jury, the courts have required that the strict letter of the statute should be observed 1 Burr. Rep. 613 and that the magistrates should have been guided by rules similar to those adopted by the common law, in criminal prosecution, and founded in natural justice; unless when the statute dispenses with the form of stating them.
     3. The general rules in relation to convictions are, first, it must be under the hand and seal of the magistrate before whom it is taken; secondly, it must be in the present tense, but this, perhaps, ought to extend only to the judgment; thirdly, it must be certain; fourthly, although it is well to lay the offence to be contra pacem, this is not indispensable; fifthly, a conviction cannot be good in part and bad in part.
     4. A conviction usually consists of six parts; first, the information; which should contain, 1. The day when it was taken. 2. The place where it was taken. 3. The name of the informer. 4. The name and style of the justice or justices to whom it was given. 5. The name of the offender. 6. The time of committing the offence. 7. The place where the offence was committed. 8. An exact description of the offence.
     5. Secondly, the summons.
     6. Thirdly, the appearance or non-appearance of the defendant.
     7. Fourthly, his defence or confessions.
     8. Fifthly, the evidence. Dougl. 469; 2 Burr. 1163; 4 Burr. 2064.
     9. Sixthly, the judgment or adjudication, which should state, 1. That the defendant is convicted. 2. The forfeiture or penalty. Vide Bosc. on Conviction; Espinasse on Penal Actions; 4 Dall. 266; 3 Yeates, 475; 1 Yeates, 471. As to the effect of a conviction as evidence in a civil case, see 1 Phil. Ev. 259; 8 Bouv. Inst. 3183.

References in periodicals archive ?
AS the festive season draws near, MoneySuPERMARKET has revealed the postal areas that have the highest rate of drivers with drink or drug driving convictions on their car insurance policies.
Across England and Wales, there were 10,364 convictions for drunkenness with aggravations in 2015/16, a rate of 18 per 100,000 people.
Quinn also rebuked the legal rule in May following news of Hernandez's vacated conviction, (https://www.
The DBS data showed more than 1,500 applications submitted to councils across Merseyside between 2015 and 2016 were made with previous convictions attached to them.
Among previous convictions revealed through the Disclosure and Barring Service for people applying for taxi licences were three rapes.
Details released by the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) for 2015-16 showed hundreds of applicants had previous convictions under their belts.
The data, released after a freedom of information request, revealed that just over 1,000 people applied for a hackney carriage or private hire licence during that period, with 176 of those listing convictions which were considered by the subcommittee.
PCC candidates must declare convictions for which they could have received a prison sentence, and it is a criminal offence to make a false statement on nomination papers, the Electoral Commission website says.
Taken as a whole, the results of our analysis imply that female representation on juries substantially affects the likelihood of conviction for a subset of cases--sexual and violent crimes--in which female jurors might have viewed the alleged behavior or its impact on the victim from a different perspective than their male counterparts," the researchers conclude.
THERE have been more than 400 convictions for animal cruelty over the past five years in Wales - most of which were down to causing unnecessary suffering to animals.
Today there are 24 county conviction integrity units within district attorneys' offices nationwide - including those in Bexar, Dallas, Harris, Tarrant and Travis counties in Texas - that work to identify and correct false convictions.
PAEDOPHILES and dangerous drivers are among those who have applied to be taxi drivers on Teesside, as one in four applications show previous convictions.