copyholder

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copyholder

a person who held land by COPYHOLD tenure.
References in periodicals archive ?
(42) Notably, the Courts of Chancery were the first to offer a remedy to copyholders. Gray suggests that one of the reasons why the common law courts chose to recognise copyhold was because of the increasing tension or rivalry between courts of the common law and chancery: ibid 68.
In his Institutes and the Compleat Copyholder, Coke provided a set of evidential rules which could be generically applied at common law in order to evidence local customs.
It was in the eastern counties that the tenure of copyhold took root during the expansive years of the sixteenth century, thus laying the ground for the emergence of the English yeomen, "a process engineered by the copyholders themselves." What a pity Smith mentions neither the wool trade, so important in the area, nor its obvious proximity to Europe, particularly Holland which developed a similarly precocious kind of agrarian social differentiation (the book contains no essay on the Netherlands).
Those present at Inions farmhouse, nestling above the vale of St Albans on the Hertfordshire-Bedfordshire border, included Robert Green, agent for the local manorial lords, the dean and chapter of St Paul's cathedral, and eight leading Caddington copyholders. Negotiations had been protracted, yet Green was confident that his terms were sufficiently attractive to bind the copyholders in to a complex transaction by which approximately 400 acres of waste in Caddington Great Wood, locally known as Caddington Common, would be improved.
Villeinage and copyhold farms were almost non-present in this region of Denmark in the first half of the 19th century, while more than 60% of the farmers on the eastern isles of Denmark were copyholders (Bjorn, 1988).
Space Saver System for today's shrinking office spaces integrates asymmetric task lighting, copyholders, and VDT arm into a compact ergonomic workstation package.
Keyboards, CRT's, copyholders and chairs are often placed at improper and uncomfortable heights.
"was partial to pretty-faced, plump-figured young ladies for copyholders in his establishment, where he read the proofs." (1c) At first the Women's Co-operative Printing Union shared a building with the firm of E.
Hunting and hawking were usually bracketed together in legislation and the game laws were enforced through Star Chamber.(151) Two statutes of 1603 and 1605 reasserted the king's rights and restricted hunting and hawking to freeholders worth at least 40 [pounds sterling] per annum or 80 [pounds sterling] copyhold, and only on their land.(152) The statutes of 1671 and 1692 effectively transferred the king's rights to the prosperous gentry and excluded those without land; freeholders with rent rolls of at least 100 [pounds sterling] and leaseholders and copyholders worth 150 [pounds sterling] per annum were now entitled to hunt anywhere.(153)
Copyholders were initially glad of the subsidy to their agricultural income.
The little available evidence indicates that a proportion of those named in manorial rent-rolls were not farming the land they tenanted.(38) We have no specific evidence on this point for Earls Colne and Colne Priory manors, but it would be a reasonable surmise that at least some copyholders were letting their land to subtenants.(39) The dilemma that absenteeism poses can be seen at Slaidburn.
Brenner -- as Patricia Croot and David Parker have pointed out -- failed to consider either the role of the customary tenant as lessor, or the possibility of land accumulation by copyholders as well as by manorial lords.(28)