corroborating evidence


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corroborating evidence

n. evidence which strengthens, adds to, or confirms already existing evidence.

References in periodicals archive ?
19) An IJ may still require an asylum seeker to provide corroborating evidence in order to sustain her burden of proof, despite finding the applicant's testimony credible, persuasive, and specific.
THE age-old requirement for corroborating evidence in criminal trials could be ditched in a planned shake-up of Scots law.
YouTube footage as evidence needs to be taken with more traditional corroborating evidence.
Investigations are on and we are corroborating evidence," the police commissioner said.
The force said officers have looked into whether there are witnesses who would speak to police and are now investigating if there is corroborating evidence to back up claims against Lord Rennard.
In accordance with the five-year prescription, the ECJ has also cancelled the fines of the Stempher group because of the lack of precise and corroborating evidence of the continuation of infringing behaviour after 20 June 1997.
Violations committed at the workplace which require investigation include any act disrupting security and order and tangible acts that cause harm to the company's interests and assets, with corroborating evidence, in addition to any explicit call preventing others from working or inciting them to stop working and deliberate violations of labour rules.
Without corroborating evidence of Harbinger's apparent ability from other races, the lack of in-depth opposition, and any real evidence that the three horses immediately behind him ran to their highest mark, the King George cannot be taken as proof that Harbinger is as good as the handicappers claim.
Otherwise, prosecutors are required to have additional, corroborating evidence before charging someone with a crime.
The investigation is now complete but if new and corroborating evidence comes to light then clearly the ACSU will re-open the matter.
Psychohistorian Robert Jay Lifton had previously expounded his theories in a 1986 book, and the filmmakers add nothing: no illustrative footage, no contrasting or corroborating evidence.
Magdalena attempted to convince the court to acquit her by arguing that there was no corroborating evidence specifically as to the element that the claims were fraudulent.