corroboration


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corroboration

noun acknowledgment, assurance, attestation, authentication, averment, avouchment, bearing out, certification, circumstantiation, conclusive evidence, conclusive proof, confirmation, demonstration, documentation, endorsement, establishment of proof, evidence, fortification, legal evidence, presentation of evidence, proof, ratification, strengthening, substantiation, support, supportability, supporting evidence, sustaining, testification, testimony, validation, validification, verifiability, verification, vindication, voucher, witness
Associated concepts: corroborating circumstances, corroborattng evidence, corroborative proof, corroborative testimony
See also: avowal, certainty, certification, confirmation, consent, documentation, evidence, ratification

corroboration

the doctrine in the law of evidence that material facts require to be proved by evidence from two independent sources as, for example, two eyewitnesses or one witness and facts and circumstances. It is often said to be very important in preventing miscarriages of justice, but the fact is often overlooked that the effect of a rule on corroboration maybe to produce two lying witnesses instead of just one. Then, if the lies are not exposed, the effect on a jury is all the stronger. Its benefit is that if two witnesses are lying it should be easier to catch them out. The story of Susanna and the Elders in the Book of Daniel in the Bible has entrenched the idea in the Judaeo-Christian world. Even in Scots criminal law, which holds the doctrine in high esteem, the rigour of the rule is relaxed in relation to confessions that show a special knowledge of the crime that only the perpetrator would know. There are many statutory relaxations of the rule both in England and Scotland. It is seldom required in either jurisdiction in civil cases. See also MOOROV DOCTRINE.
References in periodicals archive ?
O]ne who escapes persecution in his or her own land will rarely be in a position to bring documentary evidence or other kinds of corroboration to support a subsequent claim for asylum.
Former High Court judge Lord Bonomy was asked last year to consider what other changes would be needed to deal with the loss of corroboration.
Despite the abolition of the corroboration rule and destructive contradictions doctrine, however, these rules will continue to be effectively enforced by juries due to long-held beliefs on gender and sex norms.
In a report entitled Justice Matters, he said: "Abolishing corroboration would tempt them to do a less than thorough job.
The usual situation that you will face is a police officer following you and relying upon his speedometer as the corroboration.
Although the early champions and ultimate drafters of the modern present sense impression exception stressed that a percipient witness would corroborate the substance of statements admitted at trial, they failed to include any such corroboration requirement in the rule itself.
Though the editors "developed techniques for differentiating London's photographs from those taken by [others on location]," they do not reveal their methods for corroboration.
They stated that the results need further corroboration in other, larger clinical databases, although the surprising, apparently negative effect of ACE inhibitors on the chances for recurrence is, at least, cause for concern.
Though the corroboration rule traces back to English common law,
There's no better corroboration than his own words," Mr.
Students depended on system-provided relevance cues, rejected particular resource categories, examined remaining items for general and specific relevance, and primarily used a process of corroboration to assess reliability.
Under the new rule, VA would not require corroboration of a stressor related to fear of hostile military or terrorist activity if a VA doctor confirms the stressful experience recalled by the veteran adequately supports a diagnosis of PTSD and the veteran's symptoms are related to the claimed stressor.