Cosmopolite

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COSMOPOLITE. A citizen of the world; one who has no fixed. residence. Vide Citizen.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
Today, a cosmopolitan is referred to as "the citizen of the world," while the notion of cosmopolitanism is regarded as a legal and political framework that includes a vision of justice and ethical perfection -- a type of identity chosen by the individual, Beros notes.
"The Global Cosmopolitan Mindset" relates some of the stories that global leaders and entrepreneurs have shared with Professor Brimm.
Noting that the "fight is not over", Reinhart posted her photo, as well as those of Camila Mendes (Riverdale's Veronica Lodge), during their February shoot for Cosmopolitan.
We seek to investigate the role of individuals' volume of cultural capital--a set of embodied, objectified or institutionalised symbolical resources that improve chances in life (such as university degrees, occupational titles and "legitimate" ways of manoeuvring in the social world manifested in "cultivated" tastes and manners [Bourdieu 1986])--in recognising the media as instruments for accumulating and maintaining cosmopolitan capital.
The world of cosmopolitan nightclubs is far removed from the world inhabited by Diogenes the Cynic who coined the word cosmopolitan.
Cosmopolitan Philippines divulged some of Bernardo's 'fresh and fun' photos which will brighten up the magazine's glossy pages next month.
Designed with the tastes and preferences of Cosmopolitan's audience in mind, the readers shared their thoughts and opinions via surveys and product testing, offering feedback and ideas.
Periquillo fails to implement this cosmopolitan morality upon return to New Spain.
Cosmopolitan Desires includes an introduction that outlines its theoretical basis--mainly world literature criticism, postcolonial studies and Lacanian psychoanalysis--and two distinct parts, each with two and three interrelated chapters respectively.
This work leads us to consider the following question: What might cosmopolitan theory offer adolescent literacy educators, students and researchers?