court of law


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court of law

n. any tribunal within a judicial system. Under English common law and in some states it was a court which heard only lawsuits in which damages were sought, as distinguished from a court of equity which could grant special remedies. That distinction has dissolved and every court (with the exception of federal bankruptcy courts) is a court of law. (See: court, equity, chancery)

See: bar, bench, court, forum, judicatory, judicature, tribunal
References in periodicals archive ?
And the information available with FBR are photocopies, which aren't admissible as evidence in a court of law.
It is worth mentioning that according to the Romanian Criminal Code in force (since 1969), the ancillary punishment of restriction of rights cannot be served if the court of law has ruled the conditional remission of the principal punishment or licence supervision.
Lebanon magistrate Claude Karam take up the Case by launching an inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the crime by identifying potential culprits who could have been involved by making them stand trial at the court of law.
I do know what I am talking about because I was also abused in a court of law when I was the victim and they too made me feel like a criminal.
Eventually, the court of law said on Monday that a final decision will be made in December, pending the arrival of new evidence.
Today, almost every court of equity has merged into a court of law.
About 200 years ago, coerced testimony was recognized as useless for arriving at truth in a court of law.
It is not, however, good enough for a court of law, where proof must be beyond reasonable doubt.
The committee was immediately compared with a court of law, because both sides of the argument will be represented by QCs and allowed to call evidence from witnesses.
If you're ever faced with taking an inkblot test, your best bet is to decline it, especially if your life, liberty, or nuts are on the line in a court of law or shrink's office.
Finally, Hall believed that his wife's successful divorce, which he felt she obtained through fraud and manipulation, threatened his right as a citizen to a fair, impartial hearing in a court of law.
To lake away a person's liberty, the government must prove its case in a court of law, and the accused must be able to present a defense.