courtliness


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By connecting the legal developments surrounding feuding and the Landfrieden to the "origins of courtliness," I hope to provide a new way of thinking about the role of violence and self-control in the medieval German romance tradition.
(32) Jaeger, Charles Stephen: The Origins of Courtliness: Civilizing Trends and the Formation of Courtly ideals, 939-1210, Filadelfia, 1985.
Courtly encounters; translating courtliness and violence in early modern Eurasia.
SIGNIFYING INSINCERITY: COURTLINESS, TREASON, AND COMMUNITY
The element of chaos in these ceremonial events added authenticity to their courtliness. Previously, an unruly dancing midget had been barked at for disobedience, while money was thrown on the floor for him to collect for his troupe.
His name traveled well; his reputation for scholarship was unimpeachable; his unfailing courtliness reflected favorably on a university that prided itself on civility.
The traditional exaltation of the noble ethos, curialitas (courtliness), which medieval European culture for centuries counterpoised to its negative opposite rusticitas (rusticity), was now supplanted with urbanitas (urbaneness).
Those who fail to keep "trawpe" with God and to obey his covenants have negative attributes conventionally seen as "Jewish," such as blindness, carnality, and disrespect for God, while positive figures, including Jewish patriarchs, display "Christian" attributes of faith, courtliness, and gratitude towards God.
But it does not prevent us from dreaming--far from it--of such superior forms of civility as the courtliness of Lacenaire, on the eve of his execution, urging a friend: 'Above all, please convey my gratitude to Monsieur Scribe.
And, in some way, Juan Ruiz tries not to disappoint and acts like that "scholar" so reminiscent of Ruiz who authored Razon de amor, bringing to Castile the "courtliness" that was current in European courts.
There is an element of sartorial anarchy, or you could call it "courage", about Les Sapeurs--a group of mostly men who, in the Congo no less, have evolved a style movement of highly tailored elegance, moral and social courtliness. The Sapeur aesthetic surrealistically and starkly contrasts with the chaos of contemporary African life in places impacted by war and poverty.