covert allusion

See: hint
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Baudelaire's covert allusion to the "Prologe" by way of comparison, in "Le Chien et le flacon," of readers to dogs and the text itself to a perfume bottle might thus offer a clue as to how one might approach the texts of Le Spleen de Paris.
His inspired detective work encompasses the identification of probable cues for music within plays, including covert allusions in stage dialogue to the names or popular refrains of well-known songs; the recognition of unusual versification and rhyme schemes that enable a quasi-forensic 'match' with extant musical settings; and the explication of the subtleties of musical form and terminology in ways that elucidate the import of a particular tune at specific moments in a dramatic spectacle.
By a subtle, complex linkage of small-scale, overtly casual actuality with myth and history, poets can manage to raise presumably covert allusions to a resounding general context.
No one, of course, is going to argue with architextuality or paratextuality, but we probably need a broad category which will cover, as far as is possible, (more or less) verifiable traces of individual texts in later texts, ranging from the close and explicit, one-to-one rewriting of the true 'palimpsest' (though as Genette realizes, an almost infinite number of hypotexts of hypo/ertexts can show through in the 'final' hypertext), through overt and covert allusions, to unconscious, masked, agonistic, repressed traces of deeply transformed precursors.
In this context, it is claimed, the harsh, contemptuous tone of The Medall should be seen not as a mark of personal alarm or defensiveness on Dryden's part, but as part of a shared Tory rhetoric of `indignant outrage'; and the political `parallel' of The Duke of Guise, with its covert allusions to Shaftesbury's exclusionist `Association', should be seen as an adroit updating, of some of the central concerns of Absalom and Achitophel in the light of the changed controversial circumstances of 1682.
Melchiori supplements the plays that constitute the second tetralogy - Richard II; Henry the Fourth, Part One; Henry the Fourth, Part Two and Henry V - with Edward III and The Merry Wives of Windsor, thereby establishing a conceptual "sextet." Two factors underline Melchiori's argument and the ensuing hypotheses: a Falstaff character appears in each of the six, and each play provides "open or covert allusions to" the Order of the Garter and its ostensible concern with issues of "Policy and Honor" (12).
In this context, it is claimed, the harsh, contemptuous tone of The Medall should be seen not as a mark of personal alarm or defensiveness on Dryden's part, but as part of a shared Thory rhetoric of `indignant outrage'; and the political `parallel' of The Duke of Guise, with its covert allusions to Shaftesbury's exclusionist `Association', should be seen as an adroit updating, of some of the central concerns of Absalom and Achitophel in the light of the changed controversial circumstances of 1682.