criticism

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criticism

noun abuse, accusation, admonition, adverse comment, analysis, animadversion, aspersion, blame, carping, caviling, censure, charge, chiding, commentary, complaining, complaint, condemnation, contravention, critical examination, critical remarks, critique, denunciation, deprecation, derogation, detraction, disapproval, discommendation, disdain, disparagement, dispraise, disvaluation, exception, fault-finding, grievance, grumbling, imputation, indictment, insinuation, iudicium, lecture, objection, obloquy, odium, opposition, opprobrium, protestation, reflection, remonstrance, reprehension, reprimand, reproach, review, revilement, scolding, upbraiding
Associated concepts: fair and honest criticism, freedom of speech, privileged criticism
See also: bad repute, blame, complaint, condemnation, culpability, denunciation, diatribe, disapprobation, disapproval, discredit, disparagement, exception, grievance, ground, guidance, impeachment, impugnation, objection, obloquy, odium, ostracism, outcry, protest, rebuff, remonstrance, report, reprimand, review, revilement, stricture

CRITICISM. The art of judging skillfully of the merits or beauties, defects or faults of a literary or scientific performance, or of a production of art; when the criticism is reduced to writing, the writing itself is called a criticism.
     2. Liberty of criticism must be allowed, or there would be neither purity of taste nor of morals. Fair discussion, is essentially necessary to, the truth of history and advancement of science. That publication therefore, is not a libel, which has for its object, not to injure the reputation of an individual, but to correct misrepresentations of facts, to refute sophistical reasoning, to expose a vicious taste for literature, or to censure what is hostile to morality. Campb. R. 351-2. As every man who publishes a book commits himself to the judgment of the public, any one may comment on his performance. If the commentator does not step aside from the work, or introduce fiction for the purpose of condemnation, he exercises a fair and legitimate right. And the critic does a good service to the public who writes down any vapid or useless publication such as ought never to have appeared; and, although the author may suffer a loss from it, the law does not consider such loss an injury; because it is a loss which the party ought to sustain. It is the loss of fame and profit, to which he was never entitled. 1 Campb. R. 358, n. See 1 Esp. N. P. Cas. 28; 2 Stark. Cas. 73; 4 Bing. N. S. 92; S. C. 3 Scott, 340;. 1 M. & M. 44; 1 M. & M. 187; Cooke on Def. 52.

References in classic literature ?
German Socialism forgot, in the nick of time, that the French criticism, whose silly echo it was, presupposed the existence of modern bourgeois society, with its corresponding economic conditions of existence, and the political constitution adapted thereto, the very things whose attainment was the object of the pending struggle in Germany.
Even in 1844, when his literary reputation was established securely, he wrote to a friend expressing his pleasure because a magazine to which he was to contribute had agreed to pay him $20 monthly for two pages of criticism.
The same insatiable criticism may be traced in the efforts for the reform of Education.
The criticism and attack on institutions, which we have witnessed, has made one thing plain, that society gains nothing whilst a man, not himself renovated, attempts to renovate things around him: he has become tediously good in some particular but negligent or narrow in the rest; and hypocrisy and vanity are often the disgusting result.
But it is open to graver criticism than the palsy of its members: it is a system of despair.
Suppress for a few days your criticism on the insufficiency of this or that teacher or experimenter, and he will have demonstrated his insufficiency to all men's eyes.
He did not hesitate to omit the proofs of these, and so far to make himself not only a precept, but an example in criticism.
At moments his deliverances seemed to stir people of different minds to fury in two continents, so far as they were English-speaking, and on the coasts of the seven seas; and some of these came back at him with such violent personalities as it is his satisfaction to remember that he never indulged in his attacks upon their theories of criticism and fiction.
This is a poetical epitome of some of the scathing criticism of scholars which appears in the first of the "Thoughts out of Season"--the polemical pamphlet (written in 1873) against David Strauss and his school.
His criticism of Stout turns on the difficulty of giving any empirical meaning to such notions as the "mind" or the "subject"; he quotes from Stout the sentence: "The most important drawback is that the mind, in watching its own workings, must necessarily have its attention divided between two objects," and he concludes: "Without question, Stout is bringing in here illicitly the concept of a single observer, and his introspection does not provide for the observation of this observer; for the process observed and the observer are distinct" (p.
But I think that they have confused various things which are very commonly confused, and that it is necessary to make several distinctions before we can arrive at what is true and what false in the criticism of introspection.
It is true that almost none of these criticisms are known by the wider public.

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