cruise


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CRUISE, mar. law. A voyage or expedition in quest of vessels or fleets of the enemy which may be expected to sail through any particular track of the sea, at a certain season of the year the region in which these cruises are performed is usually termed the rendezvous or cruising latitude.
     2. When the ships employed for this purpose, which are accordingly called cruisers, have arrived at the destined station, they traverse the sea, backwards and forwards, under an easy sail, and within a limited space, conjectured to be in the track of their expected adversaries. Wesk. Ins. h.t.; Lex Merc. Rediv. 271, 284; Dougl. 11. 509; Park. Ins. 58; Marsh. Ins. 196, 199, 520; 2 Gallis. 268.

References in periodicals archive ?
DESTINATIONS: Transatlantic cruise from New York City to London
A year ago, one cruise line opened for business and decided to really do its own thing.
Pricing usually includes all meals, shipboard entertainment (but please do not compare this to the entertainment on board traditional ocean cruise ships) as well as daily shore excursions.
s (Black Literary Authors Cruise Konnection) maiden voyage on Carnival's Fantasy was a book lover's dream.
Today, there are 15 major cruise lines in the United States (see sidebar), each offering different itineraries, amenities and price tiers.
Cruise tourism is good business, in no small part because visitors' spending isn't limited to restaurants and stops at souvenir stands.
Travelers who enjoy small gay-group cruises see it as the best of both worlds--being able to enjoy the wider possibilities of a main stream cruise while feeling comfortable being out with other gay passengers.