cry


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References in periodicals archive ?
We cry as a response to life, surely, but on a more profound level, our crying also defines life.
For the team behind this game, making Far Cry 5 a success is all about making each attribute work within a grounded-fictional view of reality.
On average, the study found, babies cry for around two hours a day in the first two weeks.
The idea is to teach the child to accept that nobody will come to their aid when they cry, which will reduce their crying and improve their sleep.
Another common reason that is probably making your baby cry is the irritability due to soiled diapers.
In the present study we report a series of 7 psychiatric patients without neurological damage who presented with an inability to cry during treatment with SSRIs, even during extremely sad or moving situations that were cited as likely to have previously initiated a crying episode.
So, if you could consider helping CRY this Halloween, please pop down to your local store and pick up a special fundraising pack - more details are at www.
Several decades ago it was suggested that newborns could cry in different ways depending on what caused the crying (Wolff, 1969).
Studies reveal those of us who have a cry when we feel stressed or upset tend to be healthier than those who bottle it up.
These individuals may cry more often than dismissively attached persons but less often than individuals with a preoccupied attachment style (Bartholomew & Horowitz, 1991).
In my journey into womanhood, I have found it necessary to learn to cry.
Redcar couple Kenny and Maralyn Bowen became involved in CRY - Cardiac Risk in the Young - when they lost their 19-year-old son Ian to Wolff-Parkinson White syndrome (WPW) in 1996.