Current Account

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Current Account

A detailed financial statement representing the debit and credit relationship between two parties that has not been finally settled or paid because of the continuous, ongoing dealings of the parties.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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The Advisor said the government had inherited 20 billion dollars Current Account Deficit and it required 2000 billion rupees for debt servicing.
The advisor said that the government was striving hard to overcome the fiscal and current account deficit to stabilize economy.
Part of the order aims to ensure that current account customers should receive an alert about unarranged overdraft charges before they incur them.
The Philippines' current account deficit is expected to further widen next year, keeping the peso weak and government securities expensive, the Washington-based Institute of International Finance (IIF) said.
Earlier, Norwich & Peterborough Building Society had said that it would close all of its current accounts by the end of August.
MORE current account customers have been ditching and switching their bank following a wave of providers cutting rates or reducing perks on their accounts.
Current accounts have no particular "use by" date, so many of us stick with the same provider year in, year out, without considering if we might be better off elsewhere.
Personal current accounts generated revenues of around PS8.7 billion in 2014, according to the CMA.
SWITCHING your current account now could also help to pay for some of your festive season outgoings.
Head of Banking, Santander, Hetal Parmar, said "The seven day Current Account Switch Service has helped to open up the current account market by giving consumers the confidence and reassurance that switching is hassle-free.
Experian, whose records go back eight years, said that in March, current accounts became the most targeted financial product for fraud attempts for the first time, overtaking mortgages.