damage

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damage

noun adversity, affliction, aggravation, declination, decline, decrement, depravation, destruction, deterioration, detriment, dilaceration, diminution, disrepair, exacerbation, grievance, hardship, harm, hurt, impairment, infliction, injury, loss, ruin, spoiling, vexation, vitiation, weakening, wreck, wrong
Associated concepts: actual loss, ad damnum clause, aggraaation of damages, business damage, conjectural damages, consequential damages, contingent damages, damages accually sustained, damages by fire, damages by the eleeents, damages in contemplation of party, damages to land, damages to person, damages to property, damages to realty, damnum absque injuria, excessive damages, exxmplary damages, future damages, general damages, inciiental damages, injuria absque damno, limitation of liabillty, liquidated damages, measure of damages, minimizing damages, nominal damages, personal injury, property damage, punitive damages, remote damages, special damages, treble damages, unliquidated damages, unusual or extraordinary damage
Foreign phrases: Nemo damnum facit, nisi qui id fecit quod facere jus non habet.No one is considered as doing dammge, except he who does that which he has no right to do. Nul sans damage avera error ou attaint. No one shall have error or attaint unless he has suffered damage. Ubicunque est injuria, ibi damnum sequitur. Wherever there is a wrong, there damage follows. Quod quis ex culpa sua damnum sentit non intelligitur damnum sentire. He who incurs a damage by his own fault is not held to suffer dammge. Damnum sine injuria esse potest. There can be dammge or injury inflicted without any act of injustice. Actus legis nemini est damnosus. An act of the law shall prejuuice no one.incapacitate, injure, lacerate, lay waste, maim, make unsound, malign, maltreat, mangle, mar, mutilate, pervert, pollute, prejjdice, ravage, ruin, sabotage, scathe, spoil, stain, taint, tamper with, trample on, traumatize, vandalize, violate, vitiate, weaken, wound, wreck, wrong
Associated concepts: damage from negligence, damage to goods, destruction, estimated damage, latent damage, loss, mitigation of damages, opportunity to repair, patent damage, permanent damage, recovery for damage, water damage

damage

verb abase, abuse, blemish, blight, break, break down, bruise, cause detriment, cause injury, cause misshief, cheapen, contaminate, corrupt, cripple, crush, debase, deface, defile, deform, degrade, demolish, destroy, devalue, devastate, diminish, disable, disfigure, disparage, disrupt, disserve, do disservice to, do violence to, harm, hurt, impair
See also: abuse, assault, cost, countervail, decrement, deface, defacement, defect, detriment, disable, disadvantage, disrepair, disservice, drawback, effect, endanger, eviscerate, expense, harm, impair, injure, injury, maim, mischief, mutilate, penalty, persecute, pillage, prejudice, sacrifice, spoil, stain, strike, toll, vitiate, wear and tear

DAMAGE, torts. The loss caused by one person to another, or to his property, either with the design of injuring him, with negligence and carelessness, or by inevitable accident.
     2. He who has caused the damage is bound to repair it and, if he has done it maliciously, he may be. compelled to pay beyond the actual loss. When damage occurs by accident, without blame to anyone, the loss is borne by the owner of the thing injured; as, if a horse run away with his rider, without any fault of the latter, and injure the property of another person, the injury is the loss of the owner of the thing. When the damage happens by the act of God, or inevitable accident, as by tempest, earthquake or other natural cause, the loss must be borne by the owner. Vide Com. Dig. h.t.; Sayer on Damages.
     3. Pothier defines damage (dommiges et interets) to be the loss which some one has sustained, and the gain which he has failed of making. Obl. n. 159.

References in periodicals archive ?
It is estimated that Stuxnet crippled around 1,000 of 5,000 Natanz centrifuges by spinning them at damagingly high speeds.
That's the beauty of getting older" Actress and director Kathy Burke "Oliver Letwin powerfully and damagingly confirms an old perception that the Tories really are selfish, bigoted plonkers" Design guru Stephen Bayley on the Cabinet Office Minister's remark that "we don't want people from Sheffield flying away on cheap holidays" "I don't like interviews, and do them very rarely.
Less damagingly, although to the considerable chagrin of odds-on punters, Zaidpour, who seemed to enjoy the easiest of races when running away with the Royal Bond, was turned over by the Mouse Morris-trained First Lieutenant in the Grade 1 novice hurdle.
Yet it leaves the Prime Minister's denials of such negotiations damagingly exposed and is the final nail in the coffin for the corpse of Labour's old ethical foreign poli-cy.
Broad, 15 not out overnight, was dropped twice, most damagingly of all on 21 when McCullum floored a routine second slip chance off Chris Martin.
It's easy to crank up the sound to damagingly loud levels, especially in busy streets or on public transport.
Most damagingly, she had to make a tearful public apology after making Downing Street aides deny a true story.
Finally, most damagingly of all, Bouchard's polemical stance leads her to adopt an entirely prescriptive and monolithic approach to the question of the relationship between modernism and postmodernism.
However, even more damagingly for the club's title prospects, six of their players have been charged with misconduct and, if they are all found guilty, their total suspensions could even surpass 20 matches.
By cluttering the stage so damagingly, this production loses far too much of the frugal starkness of small-town New Hampshire in 1901, an essential element of the play's hymn to ordinary everyday life and death.
The last contribution shows how damagingly dissonant are individual contributors' notions of 'invention'.
Even more damagingly, it omits gramophone records, tapes, CDs-a great pity since those poets who were the keenest to communicate orally booked into studios and negotiated contracts with recording companies.