dead

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dead

adjective at rest, bereft of life, breathless, buried, cadaverous, deceased, defunct, demised, departed, deearted this life, deprived of life, destitute of life, devoid of life, dormant, ended, exanimate, expired, extinct, inactive, inert, lifeless, long gone, no longer living, not possessing life, passed away, still, terminated, without a sign of life, without life, without the appearance of life
Associated concepts: dead-born, next of kin, presumed dead, surviving spouse, wrongful death
Foreign phrases: Cadaver nullius in bonis. A dead body is no one's property.

dead

noun corpse, the deceased, decedent, the deeunct, the departed, exanimis, exanimus, fatal casualty, the late, the late lamented
Associated concepts: autopsy, dead-born, dead man's statute, decedent's estates, next of kin, presumed dead, surviving spouse, wrongful death
Foreign phrases: Extra legem positus est civiliter mortuus.He who is placed outside the law is civilly dead.
See also: deceased, defunct, invalid, late, null, obsolete, pedestrian, torpid
References in periodicals archive ?
This paper analyses two texts by African-American women writers: Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861) by Harriet Jacobs and a play by Adrienne Kennedy entitled A Lesson in Dead Language (1968).
Like Latin, Coptic is already considered a dead language and it seems implausible many undiscovered speakers of it will be discovered, an unfortunate loss for Mona Zaki, her immediate community and the Christian community worldwide.
It is a dead language in that no one speaks it, but it's still the official language of the Vatican.
The connotations of Wright's imagery are clear: Jake and his friends speak in a dead language devoid of meaningful ideas.
Not to mention derivative: For wittier mock-scholarly fiction, check out Vladimir Nabokov's Pale Fire, Mark Danielewski's House of Leaves and Lee Siegel's Love in a Dead Language.
O'Beirne's concluding chapter shows how the unremitting battle for authenticity in the struggle between living and dead language that is the subject of Nathalie Sarraute's previous works is replaced in Ici by a dramatically new possibility, the withdrawal from linguistic activity altogether.
It has been argued, for example, that an "atmosphere of remoteness and distance" is implied by the use of Latin idiom and that while the vernacular is believable when articulating emotions, "the corresponding terms of a dead language learnt from books, [have] never [been] uttered spontaneously in actual emotional situations of life.
often as indecipherable as scrolls written in a dead language -- are taking matters into their own hand and demanding that physicians heal their penmanship.
The Prince comes to understand that if Charlotte is "in torment," the cause has been that Maggie "had so shuffled away every link between consequence and cause that [Maggie's] intention remained, like some famous poetic line in a dead language subject to varieties of interpretation" (2: 345).
How do we determine what is proverbial in a dead language when native competence is no longer available to determine the currency of one particular formulation of a cultural given?
By contrast, Wichasin, a native speaker of Standard Thai and holder for a master's degree in ancient Thai inscriptions from Silapakom University, prepared herself for the difficult task of translating the dead language of Ahom by first learning to read the neighbouring living languages of Shan and Tai-Mau (Tai languages of northern Burma) for two years under the tutelage of native speakers of those two languages.
Besides making regular English an increasingly baroque language, lawyers are perceived as the only remaining profession communicating in a dead language (or at least one which is very close to pennies on its eyes).