deaf


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Related to deaf: Deaf culture, Tone deaf
See: heedless, incognizant, insensible, insusceptible

DEAF, DUMB, AND BLIND. A man born deaf, dumb, and blind, is considered an idiot. (q.v.) 1 Bl. Com. 304; F. N. B. 233; 2 Bouv. Inst. n. 2111.

References in periodicals archive ?
He noted that according to their research, only 12,000 of the 300,000 deaf children in the country are in school.
He also announced that in case the deaf persons have licence from any of the 53 countries with whom the NH and MP has mutual arrangements,they will be issued licenses without any test.
e 18-year-old, who is a European bronze medallist and holds two British deaf swimming records, nine age group records and 26 Welsh records, says that despite winning a medal for Great Britain she is "downhearted" over the lack of awareness of deaf sport.
8220;Domestic violence is a hidden issue in the Deaf and hard of hearing community, and it greatly impacts us as a Deaf community because Deaf and Hard of hearing survivors do not have equal access to information, and there are greater external factors that prevent them from being able to escape abusive relationships.
Able to function in the hearing world, Weber is paraded before deaf children and adults as a successful example of hard work and perseverance.
Kirklees Deaf Children's Society had to collect at least 3,000 signatures to get a place on the council agenda on Wednesday, September 12 to discuss its decision to cut the number of teachers of the deaf by more than a third.
Belfast overcame some big-name opponents to get their hands on the famous trophy, dumping out Leeds Deaf, Glasgow Deaf and Fulham Deaf before thumping Everton Deaf 4-1 in the final in May.
To this end, the following pages explore the intersection of deafness and Jewishness by focusing on flashpoints in the history of deaf American Jewish institutions, labor, and culture rooted in early twentieth-century New York City: the inauguration of the Horeb Home and School (HH) in 1906; the reinvention of the Institution for the Improved Instruction of Deaf Mutes (IIDM) as an explicitly Jewish institution in 1910; the creation of spaces for worship for the Jewish deaf; the shaping of the Society for the Welfare of the Jewish Deaf (SWJD) and, with it, the country's first labor board for the deaf in 1913; and, finally, the inauguration of a prominent, nationally circulated newspaper, The Jewish Deaf, published between 1915 and 1925.
For purposes of this article, I use the terms deaf and hard-of-hearing interchangeably.
At CSUN, one of two institutions in the nation that offer a comprehensive undergraduate program in deaf studies, experts say technological gadgets are contributing to some changing social dynamics for the deaf and hard of hearing.
Certainly, no group better fits this definition than Deaf persons.
Fox, a developmental psychologist at the University of Maryland at College Park, and his colleagues tested the McGurk effect in 35 children with normal hearing and 36 who were born deaf but had received cochlear implants.