estate tax

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Related to death tax: inheritance tax

estate tax

n. generally a federal tax on the transfer of a dead person's assets to his heirs and beneficiaries. Although a transfer tax, it is based on the amount in the decedent's estate (including distribution from a trust at the death), and can include insurance proceeds. Currently such federal taxation applies to the amount of an estate above $600,000, or as much as double that amount if the estate is distributed to a wife. Some states have an estate tax, more commonly called an inheritance tax.

References in periodicals archive ?
Although we made great progress during the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act negotiations, the death tax still remains an onerous and unfair tax that punishes hard-working families, said Thune.
The House tax reform plan that passed in November includes all the exemptions introduced by the Senate tax plan and also looks to abolish the Death Tax altogether in 2024.
Mr Hughes said: "This is simply a death tax which the Government are introducing to help them pay for the Courts Service.
State income taxes and any state death taxes could increase the combined tax up to near 70 percent.
But Death Tax is not just about the interplay of characters-it takes on the fraught nature of parent-child relationships, the very human fear of death, the yearning for immortality.
Opposition Conservative group deputy leader Robert Alden (Erdington) said: "Labour's planned death tax was a callous, coldhearted and frankly mean thing to do to families of this great city at a time of personal grief and tragedy.
The estate is entitled to claim the state death tax credit for the additional federal estate tax due.
According to a study by the American Family Business Foundation, just stopping President Obama's death tax hike alone would create 1.5 million jobs.
Lansley walked out of cross-party talks before the election over Labour plans for a possible death tax.
I have always believed that permanent repeal of the Death Tax represents the best policy, since it frees capital in the private market for more productive uses than fueling the federal government's spending binge; but that is not possible given the current political makeup of Congress.
On Monday, Chancellor Alistair Darling apparently ruled out the "death tax" of 10 per cent on estates in a TV debate.
Meanwhile, the so-called "death tax" remains an option to fund the National Care Service after 2015.