Litre

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LITRE. A French measure of capacity. It is of the size of a decimetre, or one-tenth part of a cubic metre. It is equal to 61.028 cubic inches. Vide Measure.

References in periodicals archive ?
If the animals' BUN concentrations are more than 12 milligrams per deciliter of blood, you're giving them dietary protein their bodies aren't using," Hammond notes.
But research has consistently shown that blood lead levels considerably lower than 10 micrograms per deciliter are associated with adverse effects.
The intensively managed patients had average blood sugar levels of 150 milligrams per deciliter--about 80 milligrams per deciliter lower than the levels observed in the conventionally managed patients.
That is defined as a reading of 20 micrograms per deciliter of blood.
Persons who consumed 3 grams daily of the soluble fiber in oat bran--the equivalent of a generous helping of cold oat bran cereals or hot oatmeal--were able to lower their cholesterol levels an average of 6 milligrams per deciliter in only three months or less.
The study revealed that Aranesp increased and maintained patient hemoglobin levels to the target level of greater than or equal to 11 grams per deciliter (g/dL) and reduced the need for red blood cell transfusions by almost half compared to placebo.
Participants were limited to those who had deficient serum ferritin levels of less than 50 micrograms per liter and hemoglobin levels above 12 grams per deciliter.
6 milligrams per deciliter higher and LDL cholesterol levels 3.
In the study, the majority (>88 percent) of patients treated with PROCRIT 20,000 Units once every two weeks achieved a target hemoglobin (Hb) of between 11 and 12 grams per deciliter of blood (g/dL).
Intellectual impairment in children with blood lead concentrations below 10 pg per deciliter.
23 micrograms per deciliter ([micro]g/dl) of blood in the last report to 1.
According to the new guidelines, a person has diabetes if two readings, on two different days, reach 126 milligrams per deciliter or higher on a simple blood test called a fasting plasma glucose - better known as fasting blood sugar.