decimation


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See: aberemurder, catastrophe, destruction, killing

DECIMATION. The punishment of every tenth soldier by lot, was, among the Romans, called decimation.

References in periodicals archive ?
But Manifest Decimation is basically my response to the world that I see.
Specific topics include: a pseudo real-time system for visualization of 3D scenes, modeling and visualization of moving objects on a digital map, a comparison of efficient decimation algorithms for polygonal models, and an indoor navigational aid system for the visually impaired.
When he wasn't alienating some with his fierce opposition to abortion rights, contraception, and sex outside marriage, he was enraging others with his total disregard for the violent history and decimation of native cultures at the hands of Christian colonizers and his comments that Brazilian predecessors had willingly converted to Christianity.
It is very distressing to see the decimation of our industries caused by this very unfair competition and I can only hope and pray Mr Brown may eventually see beyond his own rhetoric and take some positive action to reduce the levels of imports from these countries.
Knecht breaks up the gripping narrative with chapters on the toothfish's history and rapid decimation as a result of modern fishing techniques.
Author Reece spent a year witnessing the decimation of a single mountain--Lost Mountain--and surveys strip mining as not just a local concern but as a icon for a mainstream crisis involving businesses, government and the environment alike.
We have made great progress in dealing with HIV/AIDS, and yet we have not been able to stem its spread nor curtail its relentless decimation of human life.
Washington's decimation of our domestic energy industry has left our economy vulnerable to OPEC's machinations.
The decimation of the California Arts Council has affected so many artists," says Killacky, who points out that artists-in-schools programs have been cut and the National Endowment for the Arts no longer funds individuals.
Though he concentrates most heavily on the Aztec (his long standing expertise in Aztec affairs shines here) and Inca, he also covers the entire histories of these regions, from earliest times until their widespread cultural decimation under Spanish occupation.
Stunning avian creatures such as the Spix's macaw and other blue parrots drive a rare-bird trade that began in Victorian times and thrives today despite decimation of bird populations.