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Horovitz's characters have a tendency to declaim as much as they converse; too often they feel like message bearers.
Leonard, is a former teacher (which allows him to declaim fragments of poetry from time to time) and he is a wimp.
Actors with the ``rhythm'' and ``musicality'' of Americans - as Hall recently expressed his yearnings in print - who also can declaim Elizabethan meter as trippingly on the tongue as Lord Larry or Dame Judi.
Price left his job and went on to declaim the lunch menu for the state's largest school district on the Charlotte Observer's information line.
Jung-yoon declaims to the prisoners that the war will be over in a week and that he knows exactly why they are fighting this devastating war, brother against brother.
An ancient Chinese curse declaims 'May you live in interesting times.
He discusses the problems of "monitoring the supply chain," declaims on McDonald's "holistic approach," and often refers to his area of expertise as "waste management" It's easy to imagine how this kind of talk would make "speaking the same language" a near-literal as well as figurative problem in pow-wows with greens.
I picked Portia because I was a Shakespeare fan [Portia is the character in The Merchant of Venice who famously declaims, "The quality of mercy is not strain'd / It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven.
Curiously, while Clarke loudly declaims against the Bush administration's lies and coverups, he displays no similar zeal for the truth about the Clinton administration's OKC deceptions.
For The Match, Hay worked daily for a month with four arresting performers, inventing a brilliantly eccentric dance for each: Wally Cardona's release sensibility is powered by Juilliard-trained technique; Mark Lorimer declaims like all eager poet with a mouthful of pebbles; Chrysa Parkinson twitches long, spidery limbs; and Ros Warby is a crunchy-granola seductress.
A peace dove perched on his shoulder and a halo suspended over him, Uncle Sam declaims from a book on ethics.
Regarding his view of the proper role of government in a democratic society, this advocate of self-reliance states in his first significant antislavery address, "Emancipation of the Negroes in the British West Indies" (1844), that "government exists to defend the weak and the poor and the injured party," and he declaims specifically against the Senators and Representatives from Massachusetts who "sit dumb at their desks and see their constituents captured and sold.