declension


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Books in this series regard religion as "just another cultural tool used to gerrymander social space and distribute power relations in the modern world." When such an assumption is adopted in a book about religion and business, readers can be fairly certain of what they will find: a declension story of business elites leveraging religion to further their global dominance.
CAPRICORN Dec 21-Jan 20 MARS is going through a high orbital declension at the moment, which is a thing I've just made up that means next week you can expect a series of random events.
This study is intended to provide a supplementary analysis of Livonian declension classes, drawing from pedagogical work conducted by Viitso and Ernstreits (2012), much of which is summarized in Viitso 2012.
Lamenting how, according to her, the society is drifting towards moral declension, Abdullateef said shameful acts in various forms had become the order of the day.
The concluding chapter, which tracks the story of the 'common cause' through the post-Revolutionary decades, insists that the intensification of black slavery and Native dispossession after 1815 cannot be viewed as a declension narrative from the hopes of the Revolutionary era.
In her article "Russian evaluative nominalizing suffixes and change in gender", Olga Steriopolo uses the framework of Distributed Morphology to observe and analyze how evaluative suffixes (--an--,--jash--,--jon--,--ul--,--un,--ur--,--us--,--ush--, --ag,--jak,--al--,--jar--,--akh--,--il--,--in--,--ob--,--ot--,--okh--,--jug--,--uk--,--ukh--) influence the change in category features of Russian nouns, such as animacy, declension class and grammatical gender.
By shifting his primary perspective from Europeans to Indians, McDonnell not only engages with contemporary historiographical issues but also helps point the way to a new standard colonial narrative that hopefully avoids both European triumphalism and Indian declension while helping bring into view the far more complicated and compelling histories of the many varied regions that comprise North America.
described a "declension" that perfectly sums up the norm of conversation as competition: "Good, better, best, bested." The word he used, declension, means both the variation of form of nouns or adjectives, and a moral deterioration.
An Atlantic Declension, which has disruptive tasks in the eastern flank of Europe, is said to continue in the foreseeable future, adds bTV.
Peer-reviewed, revised, and edited from presentations, 21 papers address Slavic linguistics from such perspectives as surface phonotactics in morphology: ongoing change in the Belarusian noun declension, three kinds of "homogeneous" patterns of Czech numerals: a phrasal spell out account, island obviation in contrasting fragment answers: evidence from Bulgarian li-questions, Slavic-induced syntactic changes in Yiddish: a parametric account, and frequency distributions as faithless targets: why Bulgarians feminized Turkish nouns.
And yet "After Katrina" also suggests that New Orleans culture offers a way of thinking about the United States in terms that transcend the binary of national renewal or declension. The post-Hurricane city thus emerges as a flashpoint for reflecting on the contemporary United States.
A few pages later we hear from Jeanne Calment, the Guinness Book of World Records holder for longest life lived, at 122 years--then Robert Louis Stevenson is called on, Stephanie Meyer, the Catholic mass, lessons from Latin declension, the sixteenth-century French father of the essay Michel de Montaigne, and more.