deductible


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Related to deductible: Tax deductible

Deductible

That which may be taken away or subtracted. In taxation, an item that may be subtracted from gross income or adjusted gross income in determining taxable income (e.g., interest expenses, charitable contributions, certain taxes).

The portion of an insured loss to be borne by the insured before he or she is entitled to recovery from the insurer.

Automotive insurance policies frequently include a deductible, such as $250 or $500, which the insured must pay before receiving reimbursement under the policy. Usually, the insured motorist chooses among several levels of deductible, with the policy payment being somewhat lower when the insured chooses a higher deductible.

Many types of insurance policies include a deductible amount.

deductible

(Capable of being deducted from taxes), addective able to be subducted, able to be subtracted for tax purposes, allowable, capable of being deducted, capaale of being rebated, discountable, likely to decrease taxes, recoupable, removable
Associated concepts: deductible business expense, deeuctible debt, deductible expense, deductible loss, deeuctible policy

deductible

(Provable), adjective able to be connirmed, able to be shown, ascertainable, based on eviience, based on proof, capable of being figured out, capaale of being proved, conclusible, corroborative, deducible, demonstrable, derivable, documentable, expectable, following, illative, inferable, inferential, likely, presumed, probable, ratiocinative, substantiable, sustainable, testable, traceable, valid, verifiable
References in periodicals archive ?
T argues that the statute sets forth a "but for" causal test: if the cost would not have been incurred without the trustee, then it is attributable to the trustee's performance of its fiduciary duty and is thus fully deductible under Sec.
However, the Windstorm and Hail Percent Deductible endorsement, CP 03 21 06 95, specifically states that the deductible is calculated separately for the building and personal property in the building if both are lost or damaged.
If the client's expected tax rate will be lower in retirement, though, it's better to invest in a 401(k) or a deductible IRA to the extent eligible instead of a Roth IRA.
Some plans allow preventive services before the patient deductible kicks in.
If it does not, the insurer will be forced to decrease the premium rebate, resulting in less of the insured taking a deductible, an even lower cost reduction and so on.
Question: Our insured has a large $2 million property deductible. However, the period of restoration begins immediately after the loss.
ObamaCare has both failed to curb insurance premiums and contributed significantly toward deductibles that often make care too expensive even for the insured.
In the out-of-network column, the carrier says, "You pay 40% [for the diagnostic visit] after you pay your deductible."
The research is important as many employers are turning to high deductible health plans to combat their own expenses providing health coverage for employees.
However, MEI's loss settlement could be either $990,000 or $1,000,000, depending on how the deductible is applied.
The key underwriting factors are the total insured value of the property; the property's location; whether the building is residential or commercial; the construction materials used; the size of the deductible on the primary property policy; the age of the property, and the number of floors.