deductible


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to deductible: Tax deductible

Deductible

That which may be taken away or subtracted. In taxation, an item that may be subtracted from gross income or adjusted gross income in determining taxable income (e.g., interest expenses, charitable contributions, certain taxes).

The portion of an insured loss to be borne by the insured before he or she is entitled to recovery from the insurer.

Automotive insurance policies frequently include a deductible, such as $250 or $500, which the insured must pay before receiving reimbursement under the policy. Usually, the insured motorist chooses among several levels of deductible, with the policy payment being somewhat lower when the insured chooses a higher deductible.

Many types of insurance policies include a deductible amount.

deductible

(Capable of being deducted from taxes), addective able to be subducted, able to be subtracted for tax purposes, allowable, capable of being deducted, capaale of being rebated, discountable, likely to decrease taxes, recoupable, removable
Associated concepts: deductible business expense, deeuctible debt, deductible expense, deductible loss, deeuctible policy

deductible

(Provable), adjective able to be connirmed, able to be shown, ascertainable, based on eviience, based on proof, capable of being figured out, capaale of being proved, conclusible, corroborative, deducible, demonstrable, derivable, documentable, expectable, following, illative, inferable, inferential, likely, presumed, probable, ratiocinative, substantiable, sustainable, testable, traceable, valid, verifiable
References in periodicals archive ?
Since 2010," wrote the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) on September 22, "both the share of workers with deductibles and the size of those deductibles have increased sharply.
Elephant's no reset guarantee is the first of its kind, promising not to reset your deductible after an accident, but instead freezes your deductible until your policy renewal, at which point savings resume
Allstate's plan gives customers an immediate $100 off their deductible and another $100 off for each year they're accident-free, up to $500, the same as Nationwide.
About half (51 percent) of households have enough liquid assets to cover a higher-range annual deductible of $2,500 for an individual or $5,000 for a family.
The court noted, however, that "[o]ther costs ordinarily incurred by masts, such as fees paid to trustees, expenses associated with judicial accountings, and the costs of preparing and filing fiduciary income tax returns, are not ordinarily incurred by individual taxpayers, and they would be fully deductible under the exception created by [section] 67(e)" Id.
The rules on who can contribute and how much to deductible and Roth IRAs can be found in IRS Publication 590 at www.
After the deductible is met, traditional insurance kicks in, usually with employees picking up 10-20 percent of the costs until the out-of-pocket maximum is reached.
Because of the higher deductibles, the savings plans also can encourage many lower-income and middle-class patients to put off health care at the beginning of an illness, which can lead to more costly care later on.
Contractual negotiation limitations and fear of increased deductibles have led to their skepticism about the plans.
24402 deduction is limited by 24402(b), and the remainder of the qualifying dividend may be deductible under Sec.
This precludes the application of a deductible rate determined from the sample to other years going forward or back.