deep pockets


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deep pockets

noun abounding wealth, abundance, abundant wealth, bounteous wealth, bountiful material wealth, riches, source of sufficient funds, substantial assets, substantial support, substantial wealth, wealth, wealthy, well-off, well-provided, well-situated, well-stocked
Associated concepts: insurance, predatory pricing
References in periodicals archive ?
Now, as we get to the later stages of the North Sea, long-term investment, deep pockets from the UK Government is going to be really important to recover that oil and gas."
Deep Pockets was an even unlikelier winner of the amateur riders' handicap chase for the Gay Kindersley Salver, as favourite Strongbows Legend winged away until arrowing into the turf three out.
Because the sale price for Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village is so high, the purchaser would likely be a joint venture between one or more institutional investors, an investor class known for its deep pockets.
With prices for aluminum and copper scrap far greater than traditional record prices, the extension of payments adds strain to the financial well being of many scrap processors, especially those that do not have deep pockets.
In any case, the deep pockets of the world are looking east to Asia.
While any reasonable price control legislation looks unlikely to materialize as long as our politicians remain in the deep pockets of the drug industry and its powerful lobby, we taxpayers are the ones paying for it.
Diaghilev was constantly in search of funding, while de Mare had deep pockets, so much so that his company's Paris opening was accompanied by 100 musicians.
Domestic workers may be more likely to sue affluent employers because they think their employers have deep pockets. If the case goes to court, juries can side with the underdog, instead of the wealthy employer.
``We have a long-standing, clear, and consistent policy of not allowing advocacy ads so that deep pockets cannot control one side of a public policy debate, be it conservative or liberal,'' a network official said.
For example, on the shakeout conveyor, castings with shallow to deep pockets were filled with sand, which resulted in increased sand to the landfill and longer shot blast times.
But how long can Softbank CEO Masayoshi Son fight against the deep pockets of an NTT banded together with the sole purpose of eliminating pesky price-cutters like Softbank?