defraud

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Defraud

To make a Misrepresentation of an existing material fact, knowing it to be false or making it recklessly without regard to whether it is true or false, intending for someone to rely on the misrepresentation and under circumstances in which such person does rely on it to his or her damage. To practice Fraud; to cheat or trick. To deprive a person of property or any interest, estate, or right by fraud, deceit, or artifice.

Intent to defraud means an intention to deceive another person, and to induce such other person, in reliance upon such deception, to assume, create, transfer, alter, or terminate a right, obligation, or power with reference to property.

defraud

v. to use deceit, falsehoods, or trickery to obtain money, an object, rights or anything of value belonging to another. (See: fraud)

defraud

to take away or withhold money, rights, property, etc., from a person by FRAUD; cheat.
References in periodicals archive ?
A part of each camp's interest was shared with the other camp; another part of the opposition was annihilated (the struggle of the vine growers was not against merchants in general but against the "defrauder traders").
The lean years after the dot-com collapse left the investing public with a hankering for visible, swift revenge on its defrauders, real and alleged.
Come on DVLA/police - get your act together and take action against these criminals and defrauders!
This time, the defrauders worked around the investor moratorium by using naive or unscrupulous nonprofit corporations to acquire properties through the program at inflated prices and with no intention of completing rehabilitation.
Strong sanctions are appropriate for defrauders, but it must be ensured that those sanctions are imposed on bad actors only, Honest businesspeople and professionals need to be protected against threats intended solely to generate larger settlements and attorneys' fees, Investors are the intended beneficiaries of the deterrence produced by securities fraud class actions, but they bear the costs when class actions get out of control in the form of higher insurance premiums for directors' and officers' insurance, as well as higher fees that accountants, lawyers, and investment bankers will charge if they face unjustified litigation risk.
The federal government is glacially moving toward reform, according to Angelica Rendon, the director of Mexico's Coalition Against Fraud, and this slow "step-by-step" process has encouraged these defrauders to set up shop in Mexico and laugh at the lack of consequences for their thievery.
I am using racial profiling as an example, but what I have said about it should apply with equal force to other types of profiling--whether it is profiling of disorderly people (squeegee men and panhandlers), disaffected youth (trench coat mafia), domestic terrorists (young to middle aged angry men), accounting defrauders (CEOs and CFOs), or tax evaders (the wealthy).
(82) The law recognizes a variety of ways to legally acquire resources in a property system, including exchange, gift, accession, confusion, and first possession, but robbers, thieves, and defrauders do not own what they acquire and cannot take the resources of others without suffering the likelihood of criminal and civil consequences intended to protect lawfully recognized owners.
Securities and Exchange Commission papers show that an entity half-owned by Coors, the brother of Adolph Coors chief executive Peter Coors and great-grandson of the brewery's founder, Adolph, handed $40 million to alleged defrauders to invest in relatively safe bank instruments.
In both cases, migrants, who were welcomed after World War II as a useful labor force, are now presented in political discourses as criminals, troublemakers, economic and social defrauders, terrorists, drug traffickers, unassimilable persons, and so forth.
Leading companies in the sector have set up a database to pool information so that serial defrauders can be refused cover.