degree


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Degree

Extent, measure, or scope of an action, condition, or relation. Legal extent of guilt or Negligence. Title conferred on graduates of school, college, or university. The state or civil condition of a person. The grade or distance one thing may be removed from another; i.e., the distance, or number of removes that separate two persons who are related by consanguinity. Thus, a sibling is in the second degree of kinship but a parent is in the first degree of kinship.

degree

(Academic title), noun academic honor, award, certificate, collegiate distinction, credentials, credit, diploma, distinction, graduation certificate, title, title of honor

degree

(Kinship), noun affiliation, blood relation, blood relationship, cognation, connation, connection, consanguinity, extraction, family connection, family relaaionship, family tie, filiation, line of descent, proximity of blood, relatedness, relationship between persons, ties of blood
Associated concepts: degree of descent, degree of kindred

degree

(Magnitude), noun amount, amplitude, caliber, consequence, dimension, enormity, expanse, extent, greatness, import, importance, intensity, largeness, measurement, might, moment, proportions, range, reach, scope, seriousness, significance, strength, tenor, value, vastness, volume, weight
Associated concepts: degree of care, degree of certainty, degree of crime, degree of disability, degree of offense, deeree of proof, degrees of criminality, highest degree of care, lesser included offenses
Foreign phrases: Quae sunt minoris culpae sunt majoris infamiae.Those things which are less culpable may be more infamous.

degree

(Station), noun classification, echelon, grade, gradus, level of development, manner, mark, ordo, plane, point, position, rank, ranking, relative position, rung, situation, stage, stage of advancement, standing, step, tier
See also: caliber, extent, magnitude, measurement, nuance, prestige, step, utmost

degree

(US) any of the categories into which a crime is divided according to its seriousness, hence murder in the first degree, murder in the second degree etc.

DEGREE, descents. This word is derived from the French degre, which is itself taken from the Latin gradus, and signifies literally, a step in a stairway, or the round of a ladder.
     2. Figuratively applied, and as it is understood in law, it is the distance between those who are allied by blood; it means the relations descending from a common ancestor, from generation to generation, as by so many steps. Hence, according to some Lexicographers, we obtain the word, pedigree (q.v.) Par degrez, by degree, the descent being reckoned par degrez. Minshew. Each generation lengthens the line of descent one degree, for the degrees are only the generations marked in a line by small circles or squares, in which the names of the persons forming it are written. Vide Consanguinity;, Line; and also Ayliffe's Parergon, 209; Toull. Dr. Civ. Frau. liv. 3, t. 1, c. 3, n. 158; Aso & Man. Inst. B. 2, t. 4, c. 3, Sec. 1.

DEGREE, measures. In angular measures, a degree is equal to sixty minutes, or the thirtieth part of a sine. Vide Measure.

DEGREE, persons. By. degree, is understood the state or condition of a person. The ancient English statute of additions, for example, requires that in process, for the better description of a defendant, his state, degree, or mystery, shall be mentioned.

References in classic literature ?
Ferguson carefully remarked that they had not gone beyond the second degree of south latitude, nor the twenty-ninth of east longitude.
This vast region is situated between the fifteenth and tenth degrees of north latitude; that is to say, that, in order to approach it, the explorer must penetrate fifteen hundred miles into the interior of Africa.
At this point I think I hear some of my better educated readers exclaim, "How could you in Flatland know anything about angles and degrees, or minutes?
About noon, or twelve hours after our start upon this unfortunate journey, we had bored to a depth of eighty-four miles, at which point the mercury registered 153 degrees F.
Thus it is not all qualities which admit of variation of degree.
When my name was called, I rose, and President Eliot, in beautiful and strong English, conferred upon me the degree of Master of Arts.
excel all who have gone before them; a degree of merit which the
And according to the degree of pleasure and pride we feel in being republicans, ought to be our zeal in cherishing the spirit and supporting the character of Federalists.
Mynheer van Baerle was a painter, as Mynheer Boxtel was a tulip-grower; he wanted somewhat more sun for his paintings, and he took half a degree from his neighbour's tulips.
When we see any part or organ developed in a remarkable degree or manner in any species, the fair presumption is that it is of high importance to that species; nevertheless the part in this case is eminently liable to variation.
The temperature of the water at the surface showed twelve degrees, it was now only ten; we had gained two.
But, inasmuch as it is equally necessary to take into account the deviation which the rotary motion of the earth will impart to the shot, and as the shot cannot reach the moon until after a deviation equal to 16 radii of the earth, which, calculated upon the moon's orbit, are equal to about eleven degrees, it becomes necessary to add these eleven degrees to those which express the retardation of the moon just mentioned: that is to say, in round numbers, about sixty-four degrees.