delate

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delate

to bring a charge against; denounce; impeach.
References in periodicals archive ?
He sparked new life Into Scolarfs side, who would reach the final after Honaldo headed home in the 2-1 semi-final win over Holland, But there would be no fairytale, Greece defying the critics and a partisan crowd to claim the Henri Delations trophy.
What I am suggesting is merely a retrieval of the Church's great tradition that celebrates reasoned faith--tides et ratio: the Thomistic-Aristotelian tradition so opposed to gnosticism, Manicheanism, Catharism, nominalism, Lutheranism (Calvinism?), and Jansenism--and that correlates with the best aspects of Enlightenment (18th C.) and Liberal (19th C.) thought that championed human rights, such as the rights to due process (especially a speedy trial and habeas corpus), to know and confront one's accusers (no secret delations), and to a jury of one's peers.
Le poids des maisonnees (en groupe ou non) a aussi ete tres important dans cette dynamique, puisqu'elles offrent un soutien social et economique, un refuge contre les delations ainsi qu'un puits de connaissances, de techniques et de savoirs.
Othello knows that such delays, "in a false disloyal knave/Are tricks of custom," but he feels that "in a man that's just,/They're close delations, working from the heart,/That passion cannot rule" (3.3.124-27).
In the quarto, "dilations" is "denotements," but Parker argues persuasively that "dilations" is really a variant of "delations," and therefore "close dilations" can mean "occult and secret accusations" (230).
"From the beginning of 1947 until the end of 1956," Congar said, "I have known only an unbroken series of denunciations, warnings, restrictions, discriminatory measures and scornful delations." ("Delation" is a pre-Vatican II term referring to a secret, accusatory report to Rome regarding the work of a theologian or biblical scholar.)