demeanor


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Demeanor

The outward physical behavior and appearance of a person.

Demeanor is not merely what someone says but the manner in which it is said. Factors that contribute to an individual's demeanor include tone of voice, facial expressions, gestures, and carriage.

The term demeanor is most often applied to a witness during a trial. Demeanor evidence is quite valuable in shedding light on the credibility of a witness, which is one of the reasons why personal presence at trial is considered to be of paramount importance and has great significance concerning the Hearsay rule. To aid a jury in its determination of whether or not it should believe or disbelieve particular testimony, it should be provided with the opportunity to hear statements directly from a witness in court whenever possible.

demeanor

noun appearance, aspect, attitude, bearing, behavior, carriage, comportment, conduct, countenance, deportment, expression, guise, look, manner, mien, physscal appearance, poise, posture, presence, way
Associated concepts: demeanor of witnesses
See also: appearance, behavior, complexion, conduct, decorum, deportment, look, manner, posture, presence, temperament
References in classic literature ?
Under the influence of kind treatment, and in the consciousness that he was loved, Ilbrahim's demeanor lost a premature manliness, which had resulted from his earlier situation; he became more childlike, and his natural character displayed itself with freedom.
Perhaps there was something, amid all the extravagant demeanor of Legrand - some air of forethought, or of deliberation, which impressed me.
The cold distance that often crossed the demeanor of the heiress, in her intercourse with Edwards, was now entirely banished, and two hours were passed by the party, in the free, unembarrassed, and confiding manner of old and esteemed friends.
On board ship he evidently assumed the hardness of deportment and sternness of demeanor which many deem essential to naval service.
A few minutes brought us to a large and busy bazaar, with the localities of which the stranger appeared well acquainted, and where his original demeanor again became apparent, as he forced his way to and fro, without aim, among the host of buyers and sellers.
My host, however, had in some degree resumed the calmness of his demeanor, and questioned me very rigorously in respect to the conformation of the visionary creature.
We stirred him up occasionally, but he only unclosed an eye and slowly closed it again, abating no jot of his stately piety of demeanor or his tremendous seriousness.
Scott is praised for the fidelity with which he painted the demeanor and conversation of the superior classes.
There was much in their demeanor which he could not understand, for of superstition he was ignorant, and of fear of any kind he had but a vague conception.
Even after he had left the room, when he was altogether unobserved, his composed demeanor showed no signs of any change.
Something of his ordinary confidence of bearing and demeanor had certainly deserted him.
He saw, grinned knowingly to himself, and faced them as so many dangers, with a cool demeanor that was a far greater personal achievement than had they been famine, frost, or flood.