demur


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Demur

To dispute a legal Pleading or a statement of the facts being alleged through the use of a demurrer.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

demur

to raise an objection by entering a DEMURRER.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
When they come to him for help in tracking a suspicious character named Vadim, he demurs.
So it is that issues of genetic medicine related to these diseases understandably involve broad social questions "about the meaning of race and ethnicity, about the promise of innovation, about the ability of diverse groups to shape healthy futures for themselves, and about who among us believes in the promise of the coming genetics revolution, who demurs, and who is best positioned to benefit from it," to quote the authors (professors of history at Rutgers U.) of this work of medical history.
A skylit reading room demurs serenely at centre, surrounded by stacks in the nineteenth-century manner.
"It's only when you get to that upper echelon of celebrity that people want to know what you do," he demurs.
Even the chambermaid demurs; she will no longer fly.
Distance runners aren't going to do well on the Atkins Diet," he demurs.
Instead, he posits one of his own: that the Soviet experience and the Cold War comprised just one of several demurs. Other detours, he writes, included such things as Weathermen violence in the late '60s, identity politics after that, and, more recently, left love of third parties.
There are two innovative aspects to the Washu, which Callum, when asked whether it isn't a rendition of the one-box design, demurs and suggests that it is more of a "one-and-a-quarter box." There is, admittedly, a slight bulge for the engine compartment (a 3.5-liter V6 is in there), which accounts for the 0.25 box.
If the world view of Bamidbar demanded an ascetic withdrawal as the final act of purity preceding the joining of God's word to this world, tractate Sotah demurs. Instead, a renunciation of oppressive relationships is called for.
demurs, for ecumenical purposes, from Rahner's suggestion that "person" be replaced by "distinct manner of subsisting." These reservations aside, he still sees Rahner's work as an important ecumenical tool.
If a firm demurs because of confidentiality concerns, ask them to omit confidential material or references to specific clients.
Warner's commentary moves towards a radical questioning, but demurs from direct encounter.