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Consumption of vitamin B6 reduces fecal ratio of lithocholic acid to deoxycholic acid, a risk factor for colon cancer, in rats fed a high-fat diet.
Trying to get around that limit and cut costs by diluting deoxycholic acid or spacing the injections farther apart doesn't seem to be an option, since phase II testing showed a loss of efficacy with that approach.
ATX-101 is a proprietary formulation of synthetic deoxycholic acid, a well-characterized endogenous compound that is present in the body to promote the natural breakdown of dietary fat.
Bile acids are the major constituent of bile and the primary bile acids, cholic and chenodeoxycholic acid, and secondary bile acids, lithocholic and deoxycholic acid, make up more than 95% of the bile acid pool.
In vitro data have shown that nebulized deoxycholic acid may impair surfactant activity (Griese, Schams, & Lohmeier, 1998).
The biliary proportion of hydrophobic deoxycholic acid also been suggested to be greater in patients with constipation than in healthy subjects.
The monounsaturated fat in olive oil may also be protective, by decreasing deoxycholic acid, a bile salt that can trigger tumor formation.
The bile acids are crucial for digesting fat, but high levels of some bile acids - particularly one type called deoxycholic acid - have been linked toan increased risk of colon cancer.
Various causes have been suggested to explain this high frequency of BL in elderly subjects: (a) anatomical modifications such as sclerosis of the gall-bladder with a consequent reduction in contractility, constrictions and convolutions of the common bile duct[17]; (b) modifications in the pool of bile acids with a progressive increase, with age, in deoxycholic acid compared with the primary bile acids[18]; (c) an increase in the lithogenic index[19]; (d) reductions in the protein factors with inhibitory capacity on cholesterol precipitation in the bile secretion [20); (e) analogous changes in other biological fluids as described in a number of studies[21, 22].