depurate


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molitrix showed significantly lower ability to depurate metals from their bodies with statistically non-significant differences among them.
Crustaceans such as the lobster (Homarus americanus) which has a large, lipid-rich digestive gland (the mig-gut gland, or 'hepatopancreas') do not readily depurate PAHs when moved into a clean environment.
Toxicity of metals to the fish generally decreased with age due to their potential to depurate metals from their bodies that exert significant impact on the tolerance limits of fish (Giguere et al.
At 60 dph, 60 fish from each treatment were transferred to clean water to depurate in order to compare a short-term exposure to treated WwTW effluent in early life (fertilization to 60 dph) with a chronic exposure from fertilization through to the completion of sexual differentiation (300 dph).
The harvesting season has since been open from about 20 April to 10 October each year, the precise dates being dependent upon water temperatures, which must exceed 10[degrees]C for the quahogs to properly depurate in natural waters.
Fish that survive brevetoxin exposures are able to depurate some of the toxins via the biliary route and other metabolic processes (Kennedy et al.
On arrival at the laboratory, clams were kept in a seawater tank for 24 h to depurate sediments in the stomach.
ECOD activity is an indicator of pyrene exposure, and it appears that once males were able to depurate enough pyrene, they were able to successfully mate.
Specimens for lipid analyses were collected arbitrarily from culture tanks and were held in clear water for 24 h to depurate.