despise


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despise

verb abhor, abominate, be hostile to, be inimmcal toward, bear malice toward, detest, disfavor, dislike, execrate, feel hostile toward, hate, have an aversion tooard, have animus toward, have aversion to, have connempt for, have ill will toward, loathe, resent
See also: contemn, decry, disdain, disfavor, dishonor, flout, misprize, rebuff, reject, renounce, spurn
References in periodicals archive ?
There was today a temptation to despise the winning motive, but he did not think there was any danger of Yorkshire going in for the losing motive.
Iranians despise the MKO for acting as a spying outfit for Saddam Hussein during the Iran-Iraq War.
Fundamentalist religions do have the right to despise and deplore homosexuality, or pork, or whatever.
Iran's reigning mullahs may "despise" the MEK as rivals for power, but Americans should also despise the group for crimes it has committed against our countrymen.
He grew to reject and despise nuclear weapons, and with scientist Albert Einstein and philosopher Bertrand Russell signed a manifesto condemning their proliferation.
Dear Editor, - One of the objectives of the terrorists' bombing campaign, according to the 'New Face' of Estee Lauder Cosmetics (Blair) is to divide the nation and destroy away of life they so despise.
Though in life Bernita Brown's Aunt Babe seemed to despise her, Bernita comes to realize her aunt's treatment of her was a reflection of her own self-hatred.
Courses such as macroeconomics, international trade, business law, and policy and regulation that undergraduates typically despise (no, despise is not too strong a word) become the ones that agrimarketers can't get enough of.
Pete Doherty of the Libertines said: "I don't think you have to be a particularly developed human being intellectually or spiritually to despise racism.
Writers have every reason to fear and despise religion -- which perennially fears and despises them -- but there was a peculiar passivity, indeed a paralysis of imagination, in this group's willingness to leave the defining process entirely to the hard-liners (and, by implication, to the earnest and incurably sloganeering efforts of the liberal soft-liners).
Chapter 3 analyzes the strategy of memoir prefaces, which indicate the desired reading public (family, or the great, or future historians), stress simple and unadorned style (most Memorialists are old soldiers who despise letters), and imply the curious paradox that subjectivity of viewpoint in some way guarantees objectivity of narrative (106).
The more you intimidate, the more you despise the hands that feed you.